Historia Magistra Vitae? The Banality of Easy Answers

Historia magistra vitae? Die Banalität des Kurzschlusses

Teaser_fur_Thunemann_16

 


The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) newspaper recently published an article by Berlin historian Alexander Demandt which had previously been rejected by the Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, a conservative political foundation. The following republication of the article by Swiss paper Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ) caused a debate. Demandt’s hypothesis: the fall of the Roman Empire provides immediate historical lessons for today’s migrant crisis which must no longer be ignored.

 

Immigrating Germanic Hordes

In his article in the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) from January, 21st 2016, Alexander Demandt employs the seemingly matter-of-fact tone of the chronicler to speak of the “end of the old order” without explicitly referencing present-day problems.[1] Those who know Demandt as a theorist of history[2] and as a classicist cannot help being irritated by this text. On the one hand, Demandt should be better aware than anyone else that the end of the Roman Empire was not simply caused by “Germanic hordes”, as he puts it, and by seemingly unmanageable “numbers of immigrants”, but by a number of complex and intertwined factors.[3] On the other hand, Alexander Demandt will probably be the last person to seriously contest the fact that the ancient topos historia magistra vitae (Cicero, De oratore, II 36)[4], at least in its popular and banal version, has become problematic, even anachronistic.[5]

The Critical Mass

Demandt begins his narrative in 376 CE, with the admittance of “Goth refugees”. Politically, according to Demandt, this was “nothing new. Rome had always been friendly to aliens. After all, according to Roman lore, even Aeneas, progenitor of the Roman people, had been an immigrant from Troy. When Romulus founded Rome, he opened a shelter on the Palatine, peopled it with asylum-seekers of any descent and made them Romans.” What follows is the dramatic turning-point: “However, immigrants could only be integrated in manageable numbers.” The narrative ends with the seemingly inevitable downfall.

According to Demandt’s line of reasoning, “it is an old question why the rich, highly developed Roman civilization could not withstand the pressure of its poor, barbaric neighbours. One often reads of Roman decadence, of a society made complacent by prosperity, a society which strove for easy lives for the individual but had no means to resist the active and vital Germanic hordes that, driven by poverty and need, flooded the Roman borders. Limited numbers of immigrants,” Demandt concludes, “could be integrated into Roman society. When these numbers reached a critical mass and started to organize themselves as an independent and powerful group, the old power structure shifted and the old order dissolved.”

Why this Text?

What, in actual fact, is “a critical mass”? And what moved the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung to print an article that is linguistically problematic, theoretically outdated and politically questionable? The Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, in whose journal “Die politische Meinung” (the political opinion) Demandt’s text was originally supposed to be published, was certainly well-advised to reject it. The story of the “end of the old order” provides no easy solutions for the challenges of our contemporary refugee and migration crises, which Demandt’s contribution of course aims at.[6] After all, today’s circumstances are completely different, and in numerous ways so. Thankfully, both Christian denominations as well as large parts of the German political landscape, particularly German chancellor Angela Merkel, argue in a more sophisticated fashion, taking a global human perspective. It seems unsurprising, therefore, that such a more refined line of reasoning, despite occasional criticism, is internationally met with broad, at times even euphoric approval.[7]

Subtle Irony?

If the editors of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung or its journalist Reinhard Müller intended to stage a scandal similar to 1986’s historians’ quarrel[8], then this would seem rather unconvincing, since such a strategy could only be classified as pseudo-enlightened populism.[9] However, maybe the readership is supposed to interpret Demandt’s lines as subtly ironic criticism of nationalist and conservative views. Considering the “Germanic hordes”, maybe we are supposed to recognize ourselves in the unknown and recognize the unknown in ourselves? It seems rather unlike that this was Alexander Demandt’s intention. However, with that premise, the article could at least help develop a critical historical consciousness as defined by Karl-Ernst Jeismann and Jörn Rüsen.[10]

__________________

Literature

  • Bernhardt, Markus / Onken, Björn (Eds.): Wege nach Rom. Das römische Kaiserreich zwischen Geschichte, Erinnerung und Unterricht. Schwalbach/Ts. 2013.
  • Koselleck, Reinhart: Historia Magistra Vitae. Über die Auflösung des Topos im Horizont neuzeitlich bewegter Geschichte. In: Id.: Vergangene Zukunft. Zur Semantik geschichtlicher Zeiten. 9th ed. Frankfurt a.M. 2015, p. 38‒66.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft. Cologne et al. 2013.

Web ressources

__________________

[1] Cf. http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/staat-und-recht/untergang-des-roemischen-reichs-das-ende-der-alten-ordnung-14024912.html [my translation] (last accessed 2.2.2016).
[2] Cf. for example Alexander Demandt: Philosophie der Geschichte. Von der Antike zur Gegenwart. Cologne et al. 2011; id.: Ungeschehene Geschichte. Ein Traktat über die Frage: Was wäre geschehen, wenn …? New edition. Göttingen 2011
[3] Cf. Alexander Demandt: Das Imperium Romanum ‒ Ordnungsmacht und Untergang. In: Markus Bernhardt/Björn Onken (Eds.): Wege nach Rom. Das römische Kaiserreich zwischen Geschichte, Erinnerung und Unterricht. Schwalbach/Ts. 2013, p. 35‒48; id.: Der Fall Roms. Die Auflösung des Römischen Reiches im Urteil der Nachwelt. Munich 1984.
[4] Historia vero testis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriae, magistra vitae, nuntia vetustatis, qua voce alia nisi oratoris immortalitati commendatur?
[5] In addition to the classic text by Reinhart Koselleck (see above), see also Hans-Ulrich Wehler: Aus der Geschichte lernen? Essays. Munich 1988, particularly p. 11‒18; for a short summary, see Benjamin Herzog: Historia magistra vitae. In: Stefan Jordan (Hrsg.): Lexikon Geschichtswissenschaft. Hundert Grundbegriffe. Stuttgart 2007, p. 145‒148.
[6] This becomes even more apparent in the online version of the article, which is preceded by a short, but quite telling interview with Reinhard Müller. Cf. FAZ, 21.01.2016, p. 6.
[7] Cf. ban.: Ruth Klüger lobt Merkels Politik. In: FAZ, 28.01.2016, p. 1.
[8] Cf. Ernst Nolte: Vergangenheit, die nicht vergehen will. Eine Rede, die geschrieben, aber nicht gehalten werden konnte. In: FAZ, 06.06.1986. An excellent contextualization is provided by Ulrich Herbert: Der Historikerstreit. Politische, wissenschaftliche, biographische Aspekte. In: Martin Sabrow/Ralph Jessen/Klaus Große Kracht (eds.): Zeitgeschichte als Streitgeschichte. Große Kontroversen seit 1945. Munich 2003, p. 94‒113.
[9] It does, by the way, seem rather telling that Reinhard Müller: Heroisch. In: FAZ, 28.01.2016, p. 8, comments on Merkel’s politics and on Ruth Klügers praise for it (cf. footnote 7) by saying: ”The chancellor is not supposed to strive for the acclaim of the world, but for the good of the German people”[my translation]. A simpler dichotomy and a more improper choice of words (“Volk” instead of “Bevölkerung”) can hardly be imagined.
[10] Cf. Karl-Ernst: Geschichtsbewußtsein als zentrale Kategorie der Geschichtsdidaktik. In: Gerhard Schneider (Ed.): Geschichtsbewußtsein und historisch-politisches Lernen. Pfaffenweiler 1988 (= Jahrbuch für Geschichtsdidaktik, vol. 1), p. 1‒24; Jörn Rüsen: Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft. Cologne et al. 2013, p. 221‒263; see Holger Thünemann: Farewell to Historical Consciousness? In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 5, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-1266.

__________________

Image Credits
Young boy in the middle of Antiquity in Palmyra (Arabic: تدمر Tadmur‎), Syria © Alessandra Kocman 2010 via Flickr.

Recommended Citation
Thünemann, Holger: Historia Magistra Vitae? The Banality of Easy Answers. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5466.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Die Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) veröffentlichte kürzlich einen Beitrag des Berliner Althistorikers Alexander Demandt, den die Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung zuvor abgelehnt hatte. Die Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ) hat inzwischen nachgelegt und mit Demandts Text einen Eklat ausgelöst. Seine These: Der Untergang des Römischen Reiches hält für die aktuelle Flüchtlingskrise unmittelbare historische Lehren bereit, die wir nicht länger ignorieren dürfen.

 

Zuwandernde Germanenhorden

Alexander Demandt schreibt in der FAZ vom 21. Januar 2016 ‒ scheinbar sachlich im Ton des Chronisten und ohne allzu expliziten Anspruch auf Gegenwartsrelevanz ‒ über “das Ende der alten Ordnung”.[1] Jeder, der Demandt als Althistoriker und Geschichtstheoretiker[2] kennt und schätzt, kann nach der Lektüre seines Textes eigentlich nur irritiert sein. Zum einen weiß wohl niemand besser als Demandt selbst, dass für das Ende des Römischen Reiches nicht nur “Germanenhorden”, wie er schreibt, und unüberschaubare “Zahlen von Zuwanderern” verantwortlich waren, sondern dass man diesen Prozess nur durch ein komplexes Geflecht unterschiedlicher Faktoren angemessen erklären kann.[3] Zum anderen wird gerade Alexander Demandt kaum ernsthaft bestreiten können, dass der antike Topos der historia magistra vitae (Cicero, De oratore, II 36)[4] in seiner populären Banalvariante längst problematisch, ja anachronistisch geworden ist.[5]

Die kritische Menge

Demandt beginnt seine Erzählung mit dem Jahr 376 n. Chr und der Aufnahme “gotischer Flüchtlinge”. Politisch, so Demandt weiter, war das damals “nichts Neues. Rom war immer fremdenfreundlich. Schließlich war nach der Überlieferung schon Äneas, der Stammvater, selbst ein Zuwanderer aus Troja gewesen. Als Romulus die Stadt gründete, eröffnete er auf dem Palatin ein Asyl, bevölkerte es mit Asylanten beliebiger Herkunft und machte sie zu Römern.” Dann folgt gewissermaßen der dramatische Wendepunkt: “Doch Einwanderer ließen sich nur in überschaubarer Zahl integrieren”. Und am Ende der Erzählung steht der vermeintlich unvermeidliche Untergang.

“Es ist eine alte Frage”, so Demandts Argumentation, “weshalb die reiche, hochentwickelte römische Zivilisation dem Druck armer, barbarischer Nachbarn nicht standgehalten hat. Man liest von Dekadenz, von einer im Wohlstand bequem gewordenen Gesellschaft, die das süße Leben des Einzelnen erstrebte, aber den vitalen und aktiven Germanenhorden nichts entgegenzusetzen hatte, als diese, von der Not getrieben, über die Grenzen strömten. Überschaubare Zahlen von Zuwanderern”, so Demandts Fazit, “ließen sich integrieren. Sobald diese eine kritische Menge überschritten und als eigenständige handlungsfähige Gruppen organisiert waren, verschob sich das Machtgefüge, die alte Ordnung löste sich auf.”

Warum dieser Text?

Was ist eigentlich eine “kritische Menge”? Und was hat die Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung dazu bewogen, Demandts Beitrag, der sprachlich problematisch, geschichtstheoretisch überholt und geschichtspolitisch fragwürdig ist, überhaupt abzudrucken? Die Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, in deren Zeitschrift “Die politische Meinung” Demandts Text ursprünglich hätte erscheinen sollen, war jedenfalls gut beraten, ihn abzulehnen. Denn die Geschichte des “Endes der alten Ordnung” hält für die gegenwärtigen Herausforderungen der Flüchtlings- und Migrationspolitik, auf die Demandts Beitrag natürlich gemünzt ist,[6] keine einfachen Lehren bereit. Die heutigen Rahmenbedingungen sind nämlich in mehrfacher Hinsicht völlig andere. Die beiden großen Kirchen in Deutschland und weite Teile der deutschen Politik, allen voran Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel, argumentieren hier zum Glück wesentlich differenzierter und in globaler humaner Perspektive. Es ist daher nicht überraschend, dass ein solcher Kurs differenzierter Argumentation ‒ neben vereinzelter Kritik ‒ auch international auf deutliche, ja teilweise geradezu auf euphorische Zustimmung stößt.[7]

Hoffentlich nur eine komplizierte Ironie

Falls die Herausgeber der Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung bzw. der verantwortliche Redakteur Reinhard Müller die Absicht gehabt haben sollten, an ein mediales Inszenierungsmuster à la Ernst Nolte 1986 ‒ Stichwort Historikerstreit ‒ anzuknüpfen,[8] wäre das wenig überzeugend, weil man diese Strategie in die Rubrik eines pseudoaufgeklärten Populismus einordnen müsste.[9] Vielleicht sollen die LeserInnen der FAZ Demandts Zeilen aber auch als subtil-ironische Kritik nationalkonservativer Deutungsmuster dechiffrieren. Für die erwähnten “Germanenhorden” hieße das dann, dass wir im Fremden das Eigene und im Eigenen das Fremde erkennen können. Dass Alexander Demandt diese Absicht verfolgt hat, ist zwar ziemlich unwahrscheinlich, aber unter dieser Prämisse wäre sein Text immerhin ein gelungener Beitrag zur Entwicklung eines reflektierten Geschichtsbewusstseins im Sinne Karl-Ernst Jeismanns und Jörn Rüsens.[10]

________________

Literatur

  • Bernhardt, Markus / Onken, Björn (Hrsg.): Wege nach Rom. Das römische Kaiserreich zwischen Geschichte, Erinnerung und Unterricht. Schwalbach/Ts. 2013.
  • Koselleck, Reinhart: Historia Magistra Vitae. Über die Auflösung des Topos im Horizont neuzeitlich bewegter Geschichte. In: ders.: Vergangene Zukunft. Zur Semantik geschichtlicher Zeiten. 9. Aufl., Frankfurt a.M. 2015, S. 38 – 66.
  • Rüsen, Jörn: Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft. Köln u.a. 2013.

Webressourcen

________________

[1] Siehe http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/staat-und-recht/untergang-des-roemischen-reichs-das-ende-der-alten-ordnung-14024912.html (zuletzt am 2.2.16).
[2] Vgl. z.B. Alexander Demandt: Philosophie der Geschichte. Von der Antike zur Gegenwart. Köln u.a. 2011; ders.: Ungeschehene Geschichte. Ein Traktat über die Frage: Was wäre geschehen, wenn …? Neuausgabe. Göttingen 2011.
[3] Vgl. Alexander Demandt: Das Imperium Romanum ‒ Ordnungsmacht und Untergang. In: Markus Bernhardt/Björn Onken (Hrsg.): Wege nach Rom. Das römische Kaiserreich zwischen Geschichte, Erinnerung und Unterricht. Schwalbach/Ts. 2013, S. 35‒48; ders.: Der Fall Roms. Die Auflösung des Römischen Reiches im Urteil der Nachwelt. München 1984.
[4] Historia vero testis temporum, lux veritatis, vita memoriae, magistra vitae, nuntia vetustatis, qua voce alia nisi oratoris immortalitati commendatur?
[5] Vgl. neben dem klassischen Text von Reinhart Koselleck (siehe die obige Literaturangabe) auch Hans-Ulrich Wehler: Aus der Geschichte lernen? Essays. München 1988, hier v.a. S. 11‒18, besonders S. 13 und kurz zusammenfassend Benjamin Herzog: Historia magistra vitae. In: Stefan Jordan (Hrsg.): Lexikon Geschichtswissenschaft. Hundert Grundbegriffe. Stuttgart 2007, S. 145‒148.
[6] Das wird in der Online-Fassung seines Beitrags, der ein kurzes, aber aufschlussreiches Interview mit Reinhard Müller vorangestellt ist, noch deutlicher als in der Druckfassung: FAZ, 21.01.2016, S. 6.
[7] Vgl. z.B. ban.: Ruth Klüger lobt Merkels Politik. In: FAZ, 28.01.2016, S. 1.
[8] Vgl. Ernst Nolte: Vergangenheit, die nicht vergehen will. Eine Rede, die geschrieben, aber nicht gehalten werden konnte. In: FAZ, 06.06.1986. Eine nach wie vor hervorragende Einordnung bietet Ulrich Herbert: Der Historikerstreit. Politische, wissenschaftliche, biographische Aspekte. In: Martin Sabrow/Ralph Jessen/Klaus Große Kracht (Hrsg.): Zeitgeschichte als Streitgeschichte. Große Kontroversen seit 1945. München 2003, S. 94‒113.
[9] Es ist übrigens bezeichnend, dass Reinhard Müller: Heroisch. In: FAZ, 28.01.2016, S. 8 Merkels Politik und Ruth Klügers Lob dieser Politik (vgl. Anm. 7) mit den Worten kommentiert: „Die Kanzlerin ist nicht dem Beifall der Welt verpflichtet, sondern dem Wohle des deutschen Volkes.“ Eine schlichtere Dichotomie und eine unpassendere Begriffswahl (Volk statt Bevölkerung!) sind kaum denkbar.
[10] Vgl. Karl-Ernst: Geschichtsbewußtsein als zentrale Kategorie der Geschichtsdidaktik. In: Gerhard Schneider (Hrsg.): Geschichtsbewußtsein und historisch-politisches Lernen, Pfaffenweiler 1988 (= Jahrbuch für Geschichtsdidaktik, Bd. 1), S. 1‒24; Jörn Rüsen: Historik. Theorie der Geschichtswissenschaft. Köln u.a. 2013, S. 221‒263; vgl. auch Holger Thünemann: Farewell to Historical Consciousness? In: Public History Weekly 2 (2014) 5, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-1266.

________________

Abbildungsnachweis
Young boy in the middle of Antiquity in Palmyra (Arabic: تدمر Tadmur‎), Syria © Alessandra Kocman 2010 via Flickr.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Thünemann, Holger: Historia Magistra Vitae. Die Banalität des Kurzschlusses. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 3, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5466.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 3
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5466

Tags: , , ,

2 replies »

  1. [Die deutsche Übersetzung findet sich unter dem englischen Text.]

    In November 2015 the group chairman of the “Alternative für Deutschland” (AfD) in the Brandenburg federal state parliament, Alexander Gauland, compared the current wave of refugees towards Germany to those “barbarians” who had overrun the Roman limes during the Migration Period.[1] Alexander Demandt, a historian of ancient history, sang the same tune in the German daily paper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung on January 21, 2016. Whether there was a mutual inspiration and who, if applicable, encouraged whom do to this historical comparison, may remain an open question.

    Holger Thünemann’s verdict against the principle “Historia vitae magistra”[2] – established by the Roman politician Cicero – raises some questions, however. Historical thinking in terms of exemplary history is present and legitimate in our historical culture even though historians and history didactics prefer genetical narratives based on the model of 19th century historiography.[3]

    Demandt‘s comparison touches on deeper layers of historical consciousness, which the history didactic Rolf Schörken has summarized under trivial forms of historical thought.[4] Conspiracy plots like those suggested by Gauland and Demandt, are, according to Schörken, well suited to “ease the individual’s menacing fear” because these plots “make abstract powers, structures and tendencies tangible and imaginable”. It seems questionable to me if such forms of historical imagination and projections of fear can be coped with or get rid of through means of cognitive instruction, as Thünemann seems to suggest.

    One should not underestimate the powerful impact of exemplary interpretations of history. These interpretations could not care less for intervals between historical events and data; they provide those simple answers that are demanded by a society under the auspices of uncertainty. I’m arguing therefore that Cicero’s dictum should be taken seriously, as goes for the “trivial”, politically undesirable efficacy of exemplary historical thought.[5]

    Holger Thünemann’s comprehension of concepts of understanding the other can be read as a subtle appeal on the Federal Republic to apply her skill of being ashamed vis-à-vis “barbarian” comparisons so prominently positioned. I do certainly agree. But isn’t this sense of shame obligated to a negative model history, too?

    ————————————–

    Im November letzten Jahres verglich der Fraktionsvorsitzende der “Alternative für Deutschland” (AfD) im Brandenburger Landtag, Alexander Gauland, die Flüchtlinge der Gegenwart mit den “Barbaren”, die während der Völkerwanderungszeit den römischen Limes überrannt hätten.[1] Der Althistoriker Alexander Demandt hat in der FAZ vom 21. Januar 2016 ins selbe Horn gestoßen. Ob hier eine wechselseitige Inspiration vorlag und wer ggf. wen zum historischen Vergleich angeregt hat, mag dahingestellt bleiben.

    Holger Thünemanns Verdikt gegen das von Cicero formulierte Prinzip “Historia vitae magistra”[2] wirft gleichwohl Fragen auf. Exemplarisches Geschichtsdenken ist in unserer Geschichtskultur auch vorhanden und legitim, wenn HistorikerInnen und GeschichtsdidaktikerInnen genetischen Narrativen nach dem Vorbild des 19. Jahrhunderts den Vorzug geben.[3]

    Demandts Vergleich rührt indes an Tiefenschichten des Geschichtsbewusstseins, die der Geschichtsdidaktiker Rolf Schörken unter die Trivialformen historischen Denkens subsumiert hat.[4] Verschwörungsgeschichten, wie sie Gauland und Demandt anklingen lassen, seien besonders geeignet, “dem Einzelnen eine gewisse Entlastung von der ihn bedrohenden Angst” zu geben, weil in diesen Geschichten “abstrakte Mächte, Strukturen und Tendenzen sinnlich greifbar und vorstellbar gemacht” würden. Ob solche Formen historischer Imagination und Angstprojektion durch kognitive Unterweisung zu bewältigen bzw. beiseite zu schaffen sind, wie Holger Thünemann offenbar meint, scheint mir fraglich.

    Man sollte die Wirkmächtigkeit exemplarischer Geschichtsdeutungen nicht unterschätzen. Diese scheren sich nicht um Zeitdifferenzen und geben die einfachen Antworten, nach denen eine verunsicherte Gesellschaft verlangt. Ich plädiere analytisch für das Ernstnehmen von Ciceros Diktum und damit des “Trivialen”, des politisch unerwünscht Wirksamen.[5]
    Holger Thünemanns Überlegungen zum Fremdverstehen sind ein feinsinniger Appell an die Kompetenz dieser Republik, sich angesichts von prominent platzierten Barbaren-Vergleichen ihrer selbst zu schämen. Dem kann man nur zustimmen. Aber ist nicht auch diese Scham exemplarischem Geschichtsdenken verpflichtet?

    References / Fussnoten
    [1] Jörn Hasselmann: Gauland vergleicht Flüchtlinge mit Barbaren, in: Der Tagesspiegel, 7.11.2015, URL: http://www.tagesspiegel.de/berlin/afd-grossdemo-in-berlin-gauland-vergleicht-fluechtlinge-mit-barbaren/12555634.html [4.3.2016].
    [2] Klassisch: Reinhart Koselleck: Historia magistra vitae. Über die Auflösung des Topos im Horizont neuzeitlich bewegter Geschichte, in: Natur und Geschichte. Karl Löwith zum 70. Geburtstag, Stuttgart 1967, S. 196-219.
    [3] Jörn Rüsen: Die vier Typen des historischen Erzählens, in: Formen der Geschichtsschreibung, hg. v. Reinhart Koselleck u. a., München 1982, S. 514-607, hier S. 537 f., 547-551.
    [4] Rolf Schörken: Geschichte im Alltag. Über einige Funktionen des trivialen Geschichtsbewusstseins, in: GWU 30 (1979), S. 73-88.
    [5] Eckhard Kessler: Historia magistra vitae. Zur Rehabilitation eines überwundenen Topos, in: Der Gegenwartsbezug der Geschichte, hg. v. Rolf Schörken, Stuttgart 1981, S. 11-33.

  2. Author’s Reply / Replik

    [For an Englisch version please scroll down]

    Geschichtsverlangen, Geschichtsbewusstsein und exemplarische Geschichtsdeutungen
    Thomas Sandkühlers differenzierter Kommentar gibt mir die Gelegenheit, meine Argumentation in zwei Punkten zu schärfen:
    Ich habe die Auffassung vertreten, “dass der antike Topos der historia magistra vitae (Cicero, De oratore, II 36) in seiner populären Banalvariante längst problematisch, ja anachronistisch geworden“ sei. Damit wollte ich nicht zum Ausdruck bringen, dass man “die Wirkmächtigkeit exemplarischer Geschichtsdeutungen […] unterschätzen“ sollte (Thomas Sandkühler). Ganz im Gegenteil: Jeder, der Geschichte an Schulen und Hochschulen lehrt, muss damit rechnen, dass es sich bei den historischen Präkonzepten seiner Adressatinnen und Adressaten im Wesentlichen um exemplarische Deutungsmuster handelt. Diese oftmals trivialen Deutungsmuster gilt es ernst zu nehmen, um sie ‒ allerdings erst in einem zweiten Schritt ‒ zu modifizieren und zu differenzieren, damit im Idealfall aus trivialem “Geschichtsverlangen“ (Jeismann) reflektiertes Geschichtsbewusstsein wird. In diesem Sinne hat Volkhard Knigge bereits vor drei Jahrzehnten für ein „verstehendes Unterrichten“ plädiert, in diesem Sinne sprach sich Karl-Ernst Jeismann für Affektklärung ‒ nicht “Affektdämpfung“ (Knigge) ‒ aus, und in diesem Sinne hat Hilke Günther-Arndt den Ansatz der Conceptual Change-Forschung für die Geschichtsdidaktik nutzbar zu machen versucht.[1] Ob Public Historians und Geschichtsdidaktiker, wenn sie sich bemühen, dieses Ziel zu erreichen, Erfolg haben, ist tatsächlich ungewiss. Aber zugleich ist dieser Versuch absolut alternativlos.

    Thomas Sandkühler weist zu Recht darauf hin, dass “exemplarisches Geschichtsdenken […] in unserer Geschichtskultur [nach wie vor …] vorhanden und legitim“ ist. Ich stimme Sandkühler in diesem Punkt zu; und mir geht es keineswegs darum, exemplarische historische Deutungsmuster generell zu diskreditieren. Entscheidend ist der Modus bzw. die Qualität des Exemplarischen. Auch in diesem Punkt ist es leicht, Alexander Demandt mit “seinen eigenen Waffen zu schlagen“. In seiner Konstanzer Antrittsvorlesung vom 5. April 1971, in der Demandt sich mit dem Thema “Geschichte als Argument“ befasste, schildert er eine antike römische Debatte über die Frage, ob man Pompeius, um den Krieg gegen König Mithridates VI. von Pontos erfolgreich zu Ende zu führen, mit der Kriegsführung betrauen “und ihm dazu außergewöhnliche militärische und zivile Vollmachten“ übertragen dürfe.[2] Der konservative Flügel des Senats berief sich auf die römische Geschichte und lehnte dies ab, und zwar deshalb, weil ein solches imperium angeblich einen Verstoß gegen die instituta maiorum bedeutet hätte. Cicero dagegen sprach sich mit folgendem Argument dafür aus: “Non igitur exempla maiorum quaerenda, sed consilium est eorum, a quo ipsa exempla nata sunt, explicandum.“ Außerdem wies er darauf hin, dass die Vorfahren, “semper ad novos casus temporum novorum consiliorum rationes accommodasse.“

    Demandt fasst diese Argumentation prägnant zusammen: “Cicero verankert das Prinzip, neue Probleme mit neuen Mitteln zu lösen, seinerseits in der römischen Geschichte, das heißt, es ist gar nichts Neues, etwas Neues zu tun“[3], sondern ‒ so könnte man ergänzen ‒ es ist Teil der römischen Tradition, auf die jede exemplarische Sinnbildung zurückgreifen muss. Allerdings handelt es sich hier sozusagen um exemplarische Sinnbildung auf einem höheren Kompetenzniveau: nicht der Inhalt bzw. der Gegenstand eines historischen Beispiels bzw. einer historischen Entscheidung sind handlungsrelevant, sondern die historisch-politischen Prämissen, Prinzipien und Rahmenbedingungen, die dieser Entscheidung zu Grunde liegen.[4]

    Fussnoten
    [1] Vgl. Volkhard Knigge: “Triviales“ Geschichtsbewußtsein und verstehender Geschichtsunterricht. Mit einem Geleitwort von Horst Rumpf. Pfaffenweiler 1988 (Geschichtsdidaktik ‒ Studien, Materialien. Neue Folge, Bd. 3), hier v.a. S. 124‒132; Karl-Ernst Jeismann: Geschichtsbewußtsein als zentrale Kategorie der Geschichtsdidaktik. In: Gerhard Schneider (Hrsg.): Geschichtsbewußtsein und historisch-politisches Lernen. Pfaffenweiler 1988 (Jahrbuch für Geschichtsdidaktik, Bd. 1), S. 1‒24, hier v.a. S. 12‒14; ders.: Geschichtsbewußtsein oder Geschichtsgefühl? Thesen zu einer überflüssigen Kontroverse. In: ders.: Geschichte und Bildung. Beiträge zur Geschichtsdidaktik und zur Historischen Bildungsforschung. Hrsg. und eingel. von Wolfgang Jacobmeyer und Bernd Schönemann. Paderborn u.a. 2000, S. 87‒100, v.a. S. 98f.; Hilke Günther-Arndt: Conceptual Change-Forschung: Eine Aufgabe für die Geschichtsdidaktik? In: dies./Michael Sauer (Hrsg.): Geschichtsdidaktik empirisch. Untersuchungen zum historischen Denken und Lernen. Berlin 2006 (Zeitgeschichte ‒ Zeitverständnis, Bd. 14), S. 251‒277.
    [2] Alexander Demandt: Geschichte als Argument. Drei Formen politischen Zukunftsdenkens im Altertum. Konstanz 1972 (Konstanzer Universitätsreden, Bd. 46), hier S. 30‒32, ebd. auch die folgenden Zitate.
    [3] Ebd., S. 32.
    [4] Vgl. ebd., S. 36.

    ———————–

    Desire for History, Historical Consciousness and Exemplary Interpretations of History
    Thomas Sandkühler’s nuanced line of reasoning provides me with an opportunity to clarify two aspects of my argument:
    I have stated the position that “the ancient topos historia magistra vitae (Cicero, De oratore, II 36), at least in its popular and banal version, has become problematic, even anachronistic”. By this I did not mean to say that one “should […] underestimate the powerful impact of exemplary interpretations of history” (Thomas Sandkühler). Quite the contrary: Everyone who teaches history in secondary or tertiary education has to expect their students’ preconceptions to take the form of exemplary interpretations of history. These frequently trivial interpretative models need to be taken seriously in order to modifiy and differentiate them in a second step. Ideally, trivial “desire for history” (Jeismann) will be transformed into reflective historical consciousness. It was in this manner that Volkhard Knigge called for an “understanding way of teaching”, that Jeismann propagated a clarification of affects – not a “dampening of affects” (Knigge) – and that Hilke Günther-Arndt tried to incorporate conceptual change research into our field.[1] It is indeed uncertain whether public historians and history educators will succeed in reaching this goal, but there is no alternative to attempting to do so.

    Thomas Sandkühler rightfully points out the fact that “historical thinking in terms of exemplary history is [still] present and legitimate in our historical culture”. I agree with this point. And my intention was not at all to generally discredit exemplary historical thinking. The decisive factor is the mode and the quality of the example. In this respect, too, it is easy to beat Alexander Demandt at his own game. In his inaugural lecture on “History as an Argument” from April 5, 1971, he described a Roman debate on whether Pompeius was “to be granted extraordinary military and civil authority” in order to successfully finish the war against king Mithridates VI of Pontos.[2] The conservative wing of the senate referred to history in order to refuse this proposal, arguing that such an imperium constituted a breach of the instituta maiorum. Cicero, on the other hand, argued for the proposal, stating: „Non igitur exempla maiorum quaerenda, sed consilium est eorum, a quo ipsa exempla nata sunt, explicandum.“ He furthermore pointed out that the ancestors “semper ad novos casus temporum novorum consiliorum rationes accommodates“.

    Demandt succinctly sums up this line of reasoning: “Cicero roots the principle of solving new problems by new means in Roman history. This means that doing something new is nothing new”[3], but rather, one could add, a Roman tradition that every form of exemplary reasoning must refer to. However, this constitutes what might be called exemplary reasoning on a higher level of sophistication: It is not the historical content of an example or a historical decision that is considered relevant, but rather the underlying historical premises, principles and contexts.[4]

    References
    [1] Conf. Volkhard Knigge: “Triviales“ Geschichtsbewußtsein und verstehender Geschichtsunterricht. Mit einem Geleitwort von Horst Rumpf. Pfaffenweiler 1988 (Geschichtsdidaktik ‒ Studien, Materialien. Neue Folge, vol. 3), particularly p. 124‒132; Karl-Ernst Jeismann: Geschichtsbewußtsein als zentrale Kategorie der Geschichtsdidaktik. In: Gerhard Schneider (Ed.): Geschichtsbewußtsein und historisch-politisches Lernen. Pfaffenweiler 1988 (Jahrbuch für Geschichtsdidaktik, vol. 1), p. 1‒24, especially p. 12‒14; id.: Geschichtsbewußtsein oder Geschichtsgefühl? Thesen zu einer überflüssigen Kontroverse. In: id.: Geschichte und Bildung. Beiträge zur Geschichtsdidaktik und zur Historischen Bildungsforschung. Hrsg. und eingel. von Wolfgang Jacobmeyer und Bernd Schönemann. Paderborn u.a. 2000, p. 87‒100, especially p. 98f.; Hilke Günther-Arndt: Conceptual Change-Forschung: Eine Aufgabe für die Geschichtsdidaktik? In: id./Michael Sauer (eds.): Geschichtsdidaktik empirisch. Untersuchungen zum historischen Denken und Lernen. Berlin 2006 (Zeitgeschichte ‒ Zeitverständnis, vol. 14), p. 251‒277.
    [2] Alexander Demandt: Geschichte als Argument. Drei Formen politischen Zukunftsdenkens im Altertum. Konstanz 1972 (Konstanzer Universitätsreden, vol. 46), p. 30‒32. My translation.
    [3] Ibid., p. 32. My translation.
    [4] Conf. ibid., p. 36.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This