Defining History as a School Subject

Geschichte als Schulfach definieren

barton_sieboerger_phw_2016_1b

 


History curriculum documents for schools often contain a statement providing a description or definition of the nature of the subject. Recent developments in South Africa draw attention to the need to provide a justification for the vision and purpose of History as a school subject.

 

History lessons and “Nation Building”

In response to calls[1] made earlier in 2015 for History to be a compulsory subject[2] in South African schools and for the history curriculum to be “strengthened,” the Minister of Basic Education appointed a Task team[3] to investigate and research the matter and held a “round table” consultation with interested groups in December 2015. In her own words, she supported the intervention on the grounds that, “[m]edia reports indicated that many of those who participated in the looting, violence and vandalism (during… xenophobic attacks) were youths … we need to equip our youth with an accurate account of our history in order for them to make educated decisions regarding their own future.”[4] Her spokesperson maintained that the curriculum change was aimed to contribute to nation building.[5] Arising from these discussions is the question of what constitutes History as a school subject and how and where it is defined. What are the components of the existing descriptions?[6]

“What is History?”

The present South African History curriculum provides this as the heading to its introduction. The paragraph reads:

“History is the study of change and development in society over time. The study of history enables us to understand how past human action affects the present and influences our future, and it allows us to evaluate these effects. So, history is about learning how to think about the past, which affects the present, in a disciplined way. History is a process of enquiry. Therefore, it is about asking questions of the past: What happened? When did it happen? Why did it happen then? What were the short-term and long-term results? It involves thinking critically about the stories people tell us about the past, as well as the stories that we tell ourselves.”[7]

Part of this definition has a direct antecedent in the Report of the History and Archaeology Panel (2000), which includes the following statement:

“History is a distinctive and well-established academic discipline with its own methods and discourses. Its field of study is potentially limitless, in that it encompasses the totality of past human experience. Among scholars who study history there can be differences and even controversy between some who regard it as an account of an actual past, and others who view it as an entirely imagined or constructed past.”[8]

These statements contain two main elements. There are what might be referred to as historical concepts and skills (change and development, the relationship between the past, present and future, and enquiry and questioning) and there is the case for history as an academic discipline, stressing particularly its narrative, critical and constructed nature.

Three visions for History

Keith Barton, in the key note address[9] at the “History Education in Africa” conference held in Durban in December 2015, sketched what he referred to as three competing visions for History: the academic discipline, democratic participation and patriotic nationalism (see illustration from his presentation above). In its definition the South African curriculum has plainly only one vision for history, the academic. There is, however, a supporting statement which follows the definition, “The study of history also supports democracy within a democracy…,” by upholding constitutional values, reflecting the perspectives of a broad spectrum of people (by race, class and gender), encouraging civic responsibility, promoting human rights and peace, and preparation for local, national and global responsibility.[10] These purposes spell out a democratic participation vision in some detail and it is interesting to observe that Barton’s description of the intersection between the academic and the democratic visions as a region of “diversity, investigation and interpretation”, applies well in this case.[11]

The implications of a definition

Before History can be “strengthened” as a school subject, it is reasonable to ask what defines it. Is it to be a strengthening within an existing vision or is the vision to be extended? So far, the discussion in South Africa has centred mainly on three issues: the state of the existing optional subject “History” in Grades 10-12; whether to create another subject or sub-subject, which could part of the Life Orientation curriculum; and to what extent there should be a more patriotic history in schools.

The present curriculum sought to strengthen the academic element. Any substantial change to the definition of History would make inevitable changes to the existing subject, its textbooks and its assessment (the National Senior Certificate examinations for Grade 12 school leavers in November each year). Any association with Life Orientation will strengthen the vision for democratic participation considerably but dilute the academic, particularly as there will likely be very few specialist History teachers for it. One of the unconscious aims of post-apartheid history teaching has been to avoid a specifically patriotic history, seeking greater inclusivity and a new national identity, as opposed to what was experienced in the apartheid years. Any change to this approach would alter History in schools considerably. Barton argues cogently, though, that it is not possible to do justice to all three visions for History at the same time, as their intersections are not compatible.

Strengthening a definition

The terms of reference for the Task team state: “Strengthen the content of History in the FET band [Grades 10-12]12,”[12] which is suitably ambiguous, perhaps, for the purposes of an investigation. What this case shows, however, is that how a curriculum chooses to define History can be of critical importance. “Strengthening” the subject depends entirely on what the subject is. Curriculum designers need to be thorough and careful in the way that they approach what is sometimes regarded as a routine task. Barton’s analysis shows clearly the need for well-considered definitions of History.

________________________

Literature

  • Barton, Keith / Levstik, Linda: Teaching History for the Common Good. New Jersey 2004.
  • Department of Education and Science: National Curriculum History Working Group Final Report. London 1990.
  • Lee, Peter et al.: The Aims of School History: The National Curriculum and Beyond. London 1992.

Web ressources

________________________

[1] See, for example, the statement by the South African Democratic Teachers’ Association ‘The importance of History teaching as a compulsory subject’ (http://www.sadtu.org.za/docs/disc/2014/history.pdf – last accessed 30.12.2015): ‘It could lead to an appreciation and celebration of those who made sacrifices and helped shape the present…. history is the most important tool that can and should be used to heal the wounds of the past in order to build a united South Africa.’
[2] The calls reported in the media were confusing, as History, in one form or another, has always been and remains a compulsory subject in the South African school curriculum till the end of Grade 9 (age 14). The only compulsory subjects for the senior secondary years (Grades10-12), now referred to as Further Education and Training (FET), have been languages, supplemented in 2006 by mathematics and “Life Orientation”.
[3] Republic of South Africa (2015) Government Gazette, No 39267, Government Notice 926 ‘Establishment of the History Ministerial Task Team.’
[4] Speech in parliament. Bekezela Phakathi ‘Department working on making history compulsory at school’, BD live, 6 May 2015, (http://www.bdlive.co.za/national/education/2015/05/06/department-working-on-making-history-compulsory-at-school – last accessed 30.12.2015).
[5] Neo Khoza ‘Education Department drafting policy on making History compulsory’ Eyewitness News, (http://ewn.co.za/2015/04/05/History-to-be-made-compulsory-for-learners – last accessed 30.12.2015).
[6] Quoted in the South African Society for History Teaching Response to the appointment of the Ministerial Task Team to oversee the implementation of compulsory history in the Further Education and Training schools, November 2015 (http://sashtw.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/History-task-team-SASHT-statement-November-2015.pdf – last accessed 30.12.2015).
[7] Department of Basic Education (2011) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement Grades 10-12, p.8 (http://www.education.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=F99lepqD6vs%3d&tabid=570&mid=1558 – last accessed 30.12.2015)
[8] Ministry of Education (2000) Report of the History/Archaeology Panel to the Minister of Education. Pretoria: Department of Education (http://www.gov.za/documents/report-historyarchaeology-panel-minister-education – last accessed 30.12.2015).
[9] Keith Barton ‘History Education for Democratic Participation.’ Key note address conference on History Education in Africa, 8 December 2015.
[10] Department of Basic Education (2011) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement Grades 10-12, p.8 (http://www.education.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=F99lepqD6vs%3d&tabid=570&mid=1558 – last accessed 30.12.2015)
[11] This is supported, too, in the South African Society for History Teaching Response, which includes a statement that ‘[t]he approach to the past should be inclusive and democratic: it should explore the experiences of ordinary men and women as well as leaders and heroes, and should deal with the political, social, economic, cultural and environmental dimensions of human experience’ from the Statement of the colloquia on School History Textbooks for a Democratic South Africa, Sparkling Waters Hotel, Rustenburg, 1993.
[12] Republic of South Africa (2015) Government Gazette, No 39267, Government Notice 926 ‘Establishment of the History Ministerial Task Team.’

____________________
Image Credits

© Keith Barton, used by permission. Presentation slide ‘History Education for Democratic Participation.’ Key note address conference on History Education in Africa, 8 December 2015.

Recommended Citation
Siebörger, Rob: Defining History as a School Subject. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5169.

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Die Lehrpläne für Geschichte enthalten oft eine Beschreibung oder Definition des Wesens dieses Fachs. Jüngste Entwicklungen in Südafrika lenken unsere Aufmerksamkeit auf die Notwendigkeit, Vision und den Zweck von Geschichte als Schulfach zu rechtfertigen.

 

Geschichtsunterricht und Nation Building

Anfang 2015 wurden Aufrufe laut,[1] Geschichte als Pflichtfach[2] an südafrikanischen Schulen zu etablieren und den Lehrplan für Geschichte zu “stärken”. Als Antwort ernannte die Ministerin für Elementarbildung ein Spezialisten-Team,[3] das die Lage untersuchen sollte, und hielt eine Beratung mit Interessierten an einem “runden Tisch” im Dezember 2015 ab. Nach eigenem Bekunden unterstützte die Ministerin diese Initiative, weil “Medienberichte darauf hindeuteten, dass viele Menschen, die an Plünderungen, Gewalt und Vandalismus (während … fremdenfeindlicher Angriffe) teilnahmen, Jugendliche waren … Wir müssen unseren Jugendlichen eine genaue Beschreibung unserer Geschichte geben, sodass sie informierte Entscheidungen über ihre eigene Zukunft treffen können.”[4] Ihr Pressesprecher betonte, daß die Änderungen im Lehrplan zum nation building beitragen sollten.[5] Diese Diskussionen führen zur Frage, was Geschichte als Schulfach ausmacht und wie und wo dies definiert wird. Was sind die Bestandteile existierender Beschreibungen?[6]

“Was ist Geschichte?”

Die Einleitung zum gegenwärtigen Geschichtscurriculum in Südafrika trägt diese Überschrift. Der Absatz hat den folgenden Wortlaut:

“Geschichte ist das Studium von Veränderung und Entwicklung in der Gesellschaft im Laufe der Zeit. Das Studium der Geschichte ermöglicht es uns zu verstehen, wie menschliches Handeln in der Vergangenheit auf die Gegenwart wirkt und die Zukunft beeinflusst, und es erlaubt uns, diese Wirkungen zu bewerten. In Geschichte geht es folglich darum zu lernen, wie wir auf eine disziplinierte Weise über die Vergangenheit und ihren Einfluss auf die Gegenwart nachdenken können. Geschichte ist ein Prozess der Erkundung. Daher geht es darum, Fragen an die Vergangenheit zu stellen: Was ist passiert? Wann ist es passiert? Warum ist es gerade dann passiert? Was waren die kurzfristigen und langfristigen Ergebnisse? Es geht darum, kritisch nachzudenken sowohl über die Geschichten, die uns andere über die Vergangenheit erzählen, als auch über die Geschichten, die wir uns selbst erzählen.”[7]

Ein Teil dieser Definition beruht auf dem Report of the History and Archaeology Panel (2000), die folgende Aussage enthält:

“Geschichte ist eine unverwechselbare und gut etablierte akademische Disziplin mit ihren eigenen Methoden und Diskursen. Ihr Forschungsfeld ist potentiell unbegrenzt, da es die Ganzheit vergangener menschlicher Erfahrung umfasst. Unter GeschichtswissenschaftlerInnen kann es unterschiedliche Ansichten und sogar Kontroversen geben zwischen denen, die Geschichte als einen Bericht über eine tatsächliche Vergangenheit betrachten und denen, die sie als eine komplett imaginierte oder konstruierte Vergangenheit sehen.”[8]

Diese Aussagen enthalten zwei Hauptelemente. Einerseits verweisen sie auf das, was als Konzepte und Fähigkeiten der Geschichte beschrieben werden könnte (Wandel und Entwicklung; die Beziehung zwischen Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft; sowie Erkundung und Fragestellung), andererseits stärken sie den Anspruch der Geschichte als eine akademische Disziplin, mit besonderem Fokus auf ihre narrative, kritische und konstruierende Natur.

Drei Visionen für Geschichte

Keith Barton skizzierte in seinem Grundsatzreferat[9] anläßlich der Tagung “History Education in Africa” in Durban in Dezember 2015 drei konkurrierende Visionen für Geschichte: akademische Disziplin, demokratische Teilhabe und patriotischer Nationalismus (siehe die Abbildung, oben, aus seinem Vortrag). Der südafrikanische Lehrplan verfolgt in seiner Definition offensichtlich nur eine Vision: die akademische. Allerdings gibt es auch eine unterstützende Aussage, die auf die Definition “Das Studium der Geschichte unterstützt Demokratie innerhalb der Demokratie …” folgt und dies durch die Aufrechterhaltung verfassungsmäßiger Werte, Widerspiegelung der Perspektiven eines breiten Spektrums von Menschen (nach Rasse, Klasse und Geschlecht), Ermutigung zu staatsbürgerlicher Verantwortung, Förderung von Menschenrechten und Frieden sowie Vorbereitung für die Übernahme lokaler, nationaler und globaler Verantwortung einzulösen hofft.[10] Diese Ziele verdeutlichen recht detailliert eine Vision demokratischer Partizipation. Es ist auch interessant festzustellen, dass Bartons Beschreibung des Schnittpunkts zwischen der akademischen und der demokratischen Vision als ein Gebiet der “Diversität, Untersuchung und Interpretation” in diesem Fall sehr passend erscheint.[11]

Die Implikationen einer Definition

Bevor Geschichte als ein Schulfach “gestärkt” werden kann, ist es vernünftig zu fragen, was sie ausmacht. Geht es um eine Stärkung innerhalb einer vorhandenen Vision, oder soll die Vision ausgeweitet werden? Bislang hat sich die Diskussion in Südafrika hauptsächlich auf drei Bereiche konzentriert: der Zustand des existierenden fakultativen Fachs “Geschichte” in den Klassen 10-12; ob ein weiteres Fach oder fachliche Dimension eingerichtet werden sollte, die Teil des Lehrplans zur Lebensorientierung sein könnte; und in welchem Ausmaß eine patriotischere Geschichte in Schulen zu erstreben ist.

Der gegenwärtige Lehrplan zielte auf eine Stärkung des akademischen Elements. Eine wesentliche Änderung der Definition von Geschichte würde unausweichliche Änderungen im jetzigen Fach, in seinen Lehrwerken und in seiner Bewertung (Prüfung für das National Senior Certificate für SchulabgängerInnen der 12. Klasse, die jährlich in November statt findet) nach sich ziehen. Jegliche Verbindung zum Fach Lebensorientierung würde die Vision für demokratische Teilhabe deutlich stärken, aber zugleich denn akademischen Charakter verwässern, insbesondere weil es vermutlich nur wenige Geschichtslehrkräfte mit entsprechender fachlicher Qualifikation geben wird. Eine der unbewussten Ziele des Post-Apartheid-Geschichtsunterrichts ist die Vermeidung einer spezifisch patriotischen Geschichte im Streben nach größerer Inklusion und nach einer neuen nationalen Identität, die sich abgrenzt von den Erfahrungen während der Zeit der Apartheid. Eine Änderung dieses Ansatzes würde Geschichte in den Schulen erheblich verändern. Allerdings argumentiert Barton überzeugend, dass es nicht möglich ist, allen drei Visionen für Geschichte gleichzeitig gerecht zu werden, weil ihre Schnittpunkte inkompatibel sind.

Eine Definition verstärken

Die Aufgabenstellung für das Spezialisten-Team lautet: “Den Inhalt von Geschichte in dem FET-Band (Klassen 10-12) stärken”,[12] was für den Zweck einer solchen Untersuchung vielleicht passend uneindeutig ist. Dieser Fall zeigt aber jedenfalls, daß die Definition von Geschichte im Lehrplan von entscheidender Bedeutung sein kann. Die “Stärkung” des Fachs hängt nämlich gänzlich davon ab, was das Fach ist. LerhplanautorInnen müssen die Aufgabe der Definition, die zuweilen als Routine-Aufgabe angesehen wird, sorgfältig und vorsichtig angehen. Die Analyse Bartons zeigt ganz klar, wie nötig wohlüberlegte Definitionen von Geschichte sind.

________________________

Literatur

  • Barton, Keith / Levstik, Linda: Teaching History for the Common Good. New Jersey 2004.
  • Department of Education and Science: National Curriculum History Working Group Final Report. London 1990.
  • Lee, Peter: The Aims of School History: The National Curriculum and Beyond. London 1992.

Webressourcen

________________________

[1] Siehe, zum Beispiel, die Stellungnahme der South African Democratic Teachers’ Association: “The importance of History teaching as a compulsory subject” (http://www.sadtu.org.za/docs/disc/2014/history.pdf – zuletzt am 6.1.2016): “Es könnte zu einer Würdigung und Ehrung derjenigen führen, die Opfer gebracht und geholfen haben, die Gegenwart zu gestalten … Geschichte ist das wichtigste Werkzeug, das kann und sollte benutzt werden, um Wunde aus der Vergangenheit zu heilen und um einen vereinten Südafrika aufzubauen.”
[2] Die Medienberichte über die Aufrufe waren verwirrend, da Geschichte in der einen oder anderen Form schon immer und immer noch ein Pflichtfach im südafrikanischen Schulcurriculum bis Ende der 9. Klasse (Alter: 14 Jahre) war und ist. Die einzigen Pflichtfächer für die sekundäre Oberstufe (Klassen 10-12), jetzt Further Education and Training (FET), waren Sprachen, ergänzt ab 2006 durch Mathematik und “Lebensorientierung”.
[3] Republic of South Africa (2015) Government Gazette, No 39267, Government Notice 926 “Establishment of the History Ministerial Task Team”.
[4] Rede im Parliament. Bekezela Phakathi: “Department working on making history compulsory at school”. In: BD live, 6. Mai 2015, http://www.bdlive.co.za/national/education/2015/05/06/department-working-on-making-history-compulsory-at-school (zuletzt am 6.1.2016).
[5] Neo Khoza: “Education Department drafting policy on making History compulsory”. In: Eyewitness News, http://ewn.co.za/2015/04/05/History-to-be-made-compulsory-for-learners (zuletzt am 6.1.2016).
[6] Zitiert in der South African Society for History Teaching Response to the appointment of the Ministerial Task Team to oversee the implementation of compulsory history in the Further Education and Training schools, November 2015, http://sashtw.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/History-task-team-SASHT-statement-November-2015.pdf (zuletzt am 6.1.2016).
[7] Department of Basic Education (2011) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement Grades 10-12, p.8, http://www.education.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=F99lepqD6vs%3d&tabid=570&mid=1558 (zuletzt am 6.1.2016).
[8] Ministry of Education (2000) Report of the History/Archaeology Panel to the Minister of Education. Pretoria: Department of Education, http://www.gov.za/documents/report-historyarchaeology-panel-minister-education (zuletzt am 6.1.2016).
[9] Keith Barton: “History Education for Democratic Participation.” Key note address, Conference on History Education in Africa, 8. Dezember 2015.
[10] Department of Basic Education (2011) Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement Grades 10-12, p.8, http://www.education.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=F99lepqD6vs%3d&tabid=570&mid=1558 (zuletzt am 6.1.2016).
[11] Auch dies wird unterstützt in der South African Society for History Teaching Response, welche die folgende Stellungnahme beinhaltet: ” … daß der Zugang zur Vergangenheit inklusiv und demokratisch sein soll: er sollte die Erfahrungen von normalen Männern und Frauen wie auch von Führungskräften und HeldInnen erforschen, und sollte die politischen, sozialen, ökonomischen, kulturellen und vom Umfeld bedingten Dimensionen menschlicher Erfahrungen behandeln ..”’; von der Statement of the colloquia on School History Textbooks for a Democratic South Africa, Sparkling Waters Hotel, Rustenburg, 1993.
[12] Republic of South Africa (2015) Government Gazette, No 39267, Government Notice 926 “Establishment of the History Ministerial Task Team”.

____________________
Abbildungsnachweis

© Keith Barton, Verwendung gestattet. Präsentations-Folie “History Education for Democratic Participation” aus der Key note address an der Konferenz zu Geschichtsunterricht in Afrika, 8. Dezember 2015.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Siebörger, Rob: Geschichte als Schulfach definieren. In: Public History Weekly 4 (2016) 1, DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5169.

Übersetzung durch Jana Kaiser: kaiser (at) academic-texts (dot) de

Copyright (c) 2016 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 4 (2016) 1
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2016-5169

Tags: , , ,

1 reply »

  1. The Present Dutch Curriculum Revision

    The Netherlands saw in 2015 the start of a broad discussion about the curriculum of the future. A first draft report was published in October last year.[1] A second draft will be presented January 23.

    According to this draft, education should focus on qualification, socialisation and personal development. Historian Bas van der Meijden (Zwolle)[2] made a short movie in which he introduced a new model (the Agora-model) for learning in which he elaborated basic ideas.[3]

    Unfortunatedly there is only a Dutch version of the report and the movie.

    The Platform 2032 asked the OECD to write a paper about the underlying motives for a redesign of the curriculum.[4]

    The new curriculum is about a new balance between the aims of education regarding qualification, socialization and personal development:
    – Knowledge and skills[5]
    – Globalization and social cohesion [6]
    – Personal development[7]

    References
    [1] Platform onderwijs 2032 – http://onsonderwijs2032.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Hoofdlijn-advies-Een-voorstel-Onderwijs2032.pdf (last accessed 2016/1/22).
    [2] From the Windesheim University for Applied Sciences.
    [3] Vorming in het onderwijs door Bas van der Meijden 2016 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXOt5t8Wz0g&feature=youtu.be (last accessed 16/1/22).
    [4] See: http://onsonderwijs2032.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/OECD-Paper-4-BASIC-PRINCIPLES-FOR-CURRICULUM-REDESIGN.pdf (last accessed 16/1/22).
    [5] Knowledge/skills: http://onsonderwijs2032.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/OECD-Paper-1-EVIDENCE-ABOUT-KNOWLEDGE-AND-SKILLS-FOR-WORK-AND-LEARNING.pdf (last accessed 2016/1/22).
    [6] Globalization/social cohesion: http://onsonderwijs2032.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/OECD-Paper-2-GLOBALIZATION-AND-SOCIAL-COHESION.pdf (last accessed 2016/1/22).
    [7] Personal development: http://onsonderwijs2032.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/OECD-Paper-3-PERSONAL-DEVELOPMENT.pdf (last accessed 2016/1/22).

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This