Digital Public History: bringing the public back in

Digital Public History: Einbezug der Öffentlichkeit | Digital Public History: L’importance de la dimension «publique»

Noiret T-Shirts

 


Digital History has reshaped the documentation methods of historians, especially their means of accessing and storing history. However, this seismic shift has occurred without any thorough critical discussion of these digital tools and practices. Digital history aims to create new forms of scholarship and new digital objects for the web.[1] But we need to ask in which ways—if any—Digital Public History (DPH) is distinct from an innovative digital history?

 

From Digital Humanities to Digital History

“Digital historical culture” is part of the wider “digital culture” permeating our society through the Internet. The sociological concept of digital culture was developed by Manuel Castells[2] and Willard McCarty[3]. In Italy, Tito Orlandi theorized the emergence of a new Koine based on his further development of scientific and methodological concepts of humanities computing as web-based communication processes.[4] By contrast, the digital humanities provide methodologies and practices that, analogous to the sciences, are suitable for the humanities.[5] These practices and concepts are elaborated within the various disciplines.[6] Thus, after the digital turn, digital historians are confronted with new epistemological issues when analysing the past.[7] They plan exhibitions with memory institutions (libraries, archives, museums, and galleries) dedicated to presenting artefacts and documents ; they collect, preserve, and curate digitised and born digital documents for these institutions;[8] they create new tools and software to support their activities; they also use social media; following  the digital turn, moreover, they are not confined to analysing written materials, but also strive to devise new forms of text-mining for processing large amounts of data between “close and distant reading” activities .[9] Digitally connected historians do not perform their profession beyond the discipline: rather, they apply their methods, traditions, and skills to deal with primary sources in different contexts and to reconstruct the past using new types of narratives.[10] Technology facilitates what is still a recognizable history profession, although digital humanities technology is part of a new historian’s craft. Historians, that is, are involved deeply in technological transformations that affect the humanities as a whole.

New practices and new tools

In the field of digital history, we are what we do and what we create. New practices and new tools define the nature and the scope of the field. Importantly, digital history corresponds not only with the tradition of the digital humanities. The question of the originality of our methods, tasks, and ultimate goals within the digital realm was raised already at an early stage in Italy; it was always clear that our priorities were quite different from those of other digital humanists.[11] Digital history, then, is about a proper epistemological dimension, one specific to historians.[12] As historians, we need to create contents, to control those contents, and to use tools in the digital realm that are different from those needed by other digital humanists confronted with literary and linguistic computing, text analysis, text encoding, and annotation. Stephen Robertson, director of the Center for History and New Media has argued, perhaps for the first time ever in the English speaking world, that digital history is different from literary studies and might be considered another discipline. His reflections influenced the 20th anniversary celebrations of the Center[13], held in the autumn of 2014,  which highlighted the importance of digital media for the history profession.[14] Robertson emphasised two points: “First, the collection, presentation, and dissemination of material online is a more central part of digital history. […] Second, in regards to digital analysis, digital history has seen more work in the area of digital mapping than has digital literary studies, where text mining and topic modeling are the predominant practices.”[15]

Digital History vs. Digital Public history

In parallel with what they write professionally about the past, historians have always queried the usefulness of their own practices in reconstructing the past. In so doing, they have explored which (other) methods or techniques might illuminate the past. Which new tools or techniques, when applied to reconstructing the past, could help transform primary sources into narratives? We first need to consider whether the historiographical process has always been communicated fruitfully to the public, not only through the written forms of scholarship typical of academic historians, but also through a differentiation between forms of communication adapted to different audiences using different media, or what Sharon M. Leon calls User-Centered Digital History.[16] Being able to translate the past into history and being able to communicate with an identified audience are essential skills for public historians, who must ask themselves “why do history if it is not for the public?” As a research field, DPH invites us to interpret the past and to prepare it for the future using technology, experiences, practices, methods, and social communication processes that underscore the need to consider what public history has already highlighted, namely, to think about audiences so as to enhance interpretation and communication processes. Should we go further back in the genealogy of humanities computing (to the 1980s, for instance), which became the digital humanities following the rise of the Internet in the early 1990s? Perhaps not, but what is part of the conversation is to understand whether DPH differs not only from the Digital Humanities, as argued, but also from Digital History. What distinguishes DPH or what I have elsewhere called digital history 2.0 (participative, crowdsourced, networked, socially mediated history)[17] from so-called “academic“ forms of Digital History?

Digital Public History and the Civic Dimension of the Past

Web 2.0 technologies enable us to engage with different communities and their knowledge and memories worldwide, thereby adding a digital dimension to traditional public history practices. After the birth of a participatory web 2.0 around 2004, different communities started to share their past globally without the mediation of historians. On the contrary, after the digital turn oral historians-cum-mediators applied their skills as historians to conveying oral memories.[18] In the digital realm, archivists keep track of civil memories using their specific skills.[19] Might we then conclude that DPH is about how a community of people shares experiences about the past via the web, experiences that are mediated through public historians’ digital skills and expertise, in the capacities as oral historians, archivists, museum staff, etc.? Is this the dimension that defines the field as bottom-up (often crowdsourced), top-down (creation of digital multi/media forms of communicating the past), user-oriented, interactive, and shared? DPH interrelates a public, its past, and public historians whereas digital history offers new digital scholarship without requiring epistemological interaction with the public as an essential condition. Digital History “enriches” the web with new forms of narratives and findings. Unlike 2.0 crowdsourced and connected web, DH is not used primarily to engage with specific publics and to reach specific social targets. DPH instead is above all about producing history in the public sphere through interactive digital means. Taking advantage of the digital turn, DPH aims to bring new voices from the past into the present because those pasts matter and because digital technologies are suited to communicating history via and in the web.

____________________

Literature

  • Jerome De Groote: Consuming History: Historians and Heritage in Contemporary Popular Culture, Hoboken: Taylor & Francis 2008.
  • Joanne Garde-Hansen, Andrew Hoskins and Anna Reading: Save as digital memories, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan 2009.
  • Erica Lehrer, Cynthia E. Milton, Monica Eileen Patterson (eds.): Curating difficult knowledge: violent pasts in public places, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan 2011.

External links

____________________

[1] Franziska, Heimburger and Émilien Ruiz: «Has the Historian’s craft gone digital? Some observations from France», Diacronie. Studi di Storia Contemporanea, n. 10/2, 2012, http://www.studistorici.com/2012/06/29/heimburger-ruiz_numero_10/ (last accessed 09.04.15).
[2] Manuel Castells: The Internet Galaxy: Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society. New York, Oxford University Press, 2001.
[3] Willard Mccarty: Humanities Computing. Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
[4] Tito Orlandi: Informatica Umanistica. Roma, La Nuova Italia Scientifica, 1990.
[5] Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, John Unsworth (eds.): A Companion to Digital Humanities, Oxford, Blackwell, 2004; see http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/ (last accessed 09.04.15). Clare Warwick: Digital Humanities in Practice., London, Facet Publishing, 2012; Melissa Terras, Julianne Nyhan, and Edward Vanhoutte: Defining Digital Humanities: A Reader. London, Ashgate, 2013.
[6] Statistical calculation, geo-location, the mapping of the past, 3D reconstructions, the management of big data, the analysis and creation of digital primary sources -Peter Haber called this “datification” process-, visual studies, etc., define digital history specific menu within digital humanities. See, Peter Haber: Digital Past: Geschichtswissenschaft im digitalen Zeitalter. München, Oldenbourg Verlag, 2011.
[7] Philippe Rygiel “L’inchiesta storica in epoca digitale”, in: Memoria e Ricerca, n.35, 2010, pp. 185-197.
[8] A recent Canadian report on the impact of the digital revolution has universal value when it says: “Memory institutions are a window to the past. Through stories, physical objects, records, and other documentary heritage, they provide Canadians with a sense of history, a sense of place, a sense of identity, and a feeling of connectedness — who we are as a people […].” “Why Memory Institutions Matter”, in Council of Canadians Academies: Leading in the Digital World: Opportunities for Canada’s Memory Institutions. The Expert Panel on Memory Institutions and the Digital Revolution., February 2015, pp. 4-6. http://www.scienceadvice.ca/uploads/eng/assessments%20and%20publications%20and%20news%20releases/memory/CofCA_14-377_MemoryInstitutions_WEB_E.PDF (last accessed 09.04.15)
[9] Franco Moretti: Distant Reading. London: Verso, 2013.
[10] See, for example, different projects (like Digital Humanities Now, http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org/ ) that curate the integration of selected blog posts worldwide into new forms of digital scholarship using the PressForward plugin for WordPress http://pressforward.org/ (last accessed 09.04.15).
[11] “Storia e Internet: la ricerca storica all’alba del terzo millennio”, in Serge Noiret (ed.): Linguaggi e Siti: la Storia On Line, in Memoria e Ricerca, n.3, January-June 1999, pp.7-20. See, also http://www.fondazionecasadioriani.it/modules.php?name=MR&op=showfascicolo&id=12 (last accessed 09.04.15).
[12] Daniel J. Cohen, Max Frisch, P.Gallagher, Steven. Mintz, Kirsten Sword, A.Murrell Taylor, William G. Thomas III, and William J Turkel: Interchange: The Promise of Digital History, in The Journal of American History, 2, 2008, pp.452-91,  http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/jah/95.2/interchange.html. (last accessed 09.04.15).
[13] RRCHNM: 20th Anniversary Conference, http://chnm.gmu.edu/20th/. (last accessed 09.04.15).
[14] Daniel J. Cohen and Roy Rosenzweig: Digital history: a guide to gathering, preserving, and presenting the past on the Web., Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005 and Clio Wired. The future of the past in the digital age. New York, Columbia University Press, 2011.
[15] Stephen Robertson: The Differences between Digital History and Digital Humanities. May 23, 2014 ; http://drstephenrobertson.com/blog-post/the-differences-between-digital-history-and-digital-humanities/ (last accessed 09.04.15).
[16] http://digitalpublichistory.org/ (last accessed 09.04.15).
[17] «Y a t-il une Histoire Numérique 2.0 ? » in Jean-Philippe Genet and Andrea Zorzi (eds.) Les historiens et l’informatique. Un métier à réinventer. Rome: Ecole Française de Rome, 2011, pp.235-288.
[18] In her keynote lecture at the 2nd Brazilian Public History Conference (September 2014), Linda Shopes said that digital history – added to social history and the presence of a targeted audience – is now central to oral history practices. Digital techniques have given back “orality” to oral history. A digital dimension has integrated online histories to web site projects, opened up public history internationally by extending traditional oral history projects, and enhanced the capacity to share interviews into audio/video formats globally and through open access. These practices enable communities to interact in their own language. A deeper understanding of local cultures differentiates international DPH from digital history and, even more, from digital humanities activities, the latter all too often being confined to the English language. See Rede Brasileira de Historia Publica: http://historiapublica.com.br/ (last accessed 09.04.15).
[19] “The materials in them hold us to our values and nourish our debates on civil society. By ensuring preservation, authenticity, and access to their holdings […]  memory institutions help guarantee transparency and accountability. Indeed, authentic records and their availability are at the heart of civil governance. Archives in particular are essential for  addressing human rights concerns, often because these concerns are not identified until well after an injustice has occurred.” “Why Memory Institutions Matter”, cit.

____________________

Image Credits
© Serge Noiret. Shot during the THATcamp 2013 in Mason.

Recommended Citation
Noiret, Serge: Digital Public History: bringing the public back in. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 13, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2014-2647.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

Digital History hat die Arbeitsgrundlage der HistorikerInnen und ihre zur Erschließung, Speicherung und zur Dokumentation verwendeten Werkzeuge verändert, ohne jedoch einen kritischen Gebrauch der digitalen Werkzeuge und Praktiken redlich zu diskutieren – dies vor allem dann, wenn es um Public History geht. Digital History zielt auf die Schaffung neuer Formen von Wissenschaft und neuer digitaler Objekte für das Internet.[1] Wir sollten uns nun selbst fragen, auf welche Weise – wenn überhaupt -, sich eine Digital Public History (DPH) von einer innovativen Digital History unterscheidet?

 

 

Von den Digital Humanities zu einer Digital History

“Digitale Geschichtskultur” ist Teil einer umfassenden “digitalen Kultur”, in der unsere Gesellschaft vom Internet durchdrungen ist. Das soziologische Konzept der digitalen Kultur stammt aus der Forschung von Manuel Castells[2] und Willard McCarty,[3] während in Italien Tito Orlandi die Geburt einer neuen Koine theoretisierte, die auf der Weiterentwicklung von früheren wissenschaftlichen und methodischen Konzepten des ‘Humanities Computing’ als internetbasierte Kommunikationsprozesse fußt.[4] Dagegen bieten die Digital Humanities Methoden und Verfahren, die analog zu den Naturwissenschaften für die Geisteswissenschaften geeignet sind.[5] Folgerichtig wurden diese Praktiken und Konzepte in den Einzeldisziplinen ausgearbeitet.[6] Die digitalen HistorikerInnen sind demnach nach dem digital turn mit neuen epistemologischen Fragen in der Analyse der Vergangenheit beschäftigt.[7] Sie entwickeln Ausstellungen mit Gedächtnisinstitutionen (Bibliotheken, Archive, Museen und Galerien), die Artefakte und Dokumente präsentieren; sie sammeln, bewahren und kuratieren digitalisierte und originär digitale Dokumente für diese Institutionen;[8] sie entwickeln neue Tools und Software für ihre Tätigkeit; sie kommunizieren in den Social Media; sie beschränken sich nicht auf die Analyse rein schriftlichen Materials und reflektieren die Anwendung von neuen Formen des Text-Minings zur Bewältigung großer Datenmengen.[9] Digital vernetzte HistorikerInnen üben ihren Beruf nicht abseits der Disziplin aus: sie wenden ihre Methoden, Traditionen, Fähigkeiten mit Primärquellen in unterschiedlichen Kontexten an und rekonstruieren die Vergangenheit mit neuen Formen historischer Narrative.[10] Die Technologie erleichtert dabei, was noch immer erkennbar mit dem Beruf des Historikers zusammenhängt, auch wenn die Technologie der Digital Humanities Teil eines neuen Geschichtshandwerks ist und die HistorikerInnen tief in die technologische Transformation eingebunden sind, die die Geisteswissenschaften als Ganzes betrifft.

Neue Praktiken und neue Tools

Auf dem Gebiet der digitalen Geschichte sind wir es nun, die die neuen Standards festlegen. Durch die Definition neuer Methoden und neuer Instrumente legen wir fest, wo das Untersuchungsfeld liegt. Eine digitale Geschichte korrespondiert nicht nur mit Traditionen der Digital Humanities. Die Frage nach der Originalität unserer Methoden, Aufgaben und Ziele in der digitalen Welt kam in Italien schon sehr früh auf; es war immer klar, dass unsere Prioritäten sich teilweise von denen der Digital Humanities unterscheiden.[11] Die digital history verfügt über eine eigene epistemologische Dimension, spezifisch für HistorikerInnen.[12] Als HistorikerInnen obliegt es uns, Inhalt zu erschaffen, zu kontrollieren und digital basierende Werkzeuge zu gebrauchen, die sich von denen der anderen Digital Humanists unterscheiden, die sich auf computerbasierte literarische und linguistische Textanalyse, Textkodierung und Annotation spezialisiert haben. Stephen Robertson, Direktor des Center for History and New Media, erklärte explizit, dass sich vielleicht zum ersten Mal in der englischsprachigen Welt die digitale Geschichte von der Literaturwissenschaft unterscheide und als eigenständige Disziplin betrachtet werden könne. Diese Einsicht beeinflusste im Herbst 2014 die Feiern zum 20jährigen Bestehen des Centers[13], die den Fokus auf die Bedeutung der digitalen Medien für historische Forschung richteten.[14] “Zuerst”, schrieb Robertson, “ist die Sammlung, Präsentation und Verbreitung von Online-Material zentraler Bestandteil der digitalen Geschichte. […] Zweitens, in Bezug auf die digitale Analyse, liegt in der digitalen Geschichte mehr Aufwand auf dem Gebiet der digitalen Kartierung als bei der digitalen Literaturwissenschaft, wo Text-Mining und Datenmodellierung als vorherrschende Praktiken gelten.”[15]

Digital History vs. Digital Public History

Parallel zu dem, was sie beruflich über die Vergangenheit schreiben, arbeiten HistorikerInnen immer wieder daran, die Praktikabilität des eigenen Vorgehens zu optimieren: Welche andere Technik könnte dabei helfen, die Vergangenheit zu beleuchten? Welche neuen Anwendungen oder Techniken könnten angewendet auf die Rekonstruktion der Vergangenheit dabei helfen, Primärquellen in Narrative zu überführen? Wir sollten uns zunächst fragen, ob die historiografischen Prozesse bislang immer für die Öffentlichkeit fruchtbar gemacht wurden – nicht nur in schriftlicher Gelehrsamkeit, die typisch für akademische HistorikerInnen ist, sondern auch durch eine Differenzierung zwischen Kommunikationsformen, die je nach Zuhörerschaft und ihren diversen Medien unterscheidet. Sharon M. Leon nennt dies User-Centered Digital History.[16] Die Fähigkeit, die Vergangenheit in eine Geschichte zu überführen und einen kommunikativen Weg für ein identifiziertes Publikum einzuschlagen, ist essentiell für die Tätigkeit der Public Historians, wenn sie sich fragen: “Warum Geschichte erforschen, wenn sie nicht für die Öffentlichkeit ist?” DPH – als ein Forschungsgebiet – fordert auf, die öffentliche Sphäre der Vergangenheit zu interpretieren und für die Zukunft aufzubereiten. Der Gebrauch von Technik, Erfahrungen, Praktiken, Methoden und Social-Media-Kommunikation hilft bei der von der Public History bereits herausgestellten Notwendigkeit, über die Zuhörerschaft nachzudenken, um damit den Interpretations- und Kommunikationsprozess zu verbessern. Wir könnten nun noch weiter im Stammbaum der humanities computing (80er Jahre) zurückkehren, die mit der Einführung des Internets in den frühen Neunziger Jahren zu den Digital Humanities wurden. Vielleicht nicht, aber es ist Teil des Austausches, dass sich DPH nicht nur wie bereits ausgeführt von den den Digital Humanities unterscheidet, sondern auch von der Digital History. Was macht DPH oder Digital History 2.0 (partizipative, kollaborative, vernetzte Social-Media-Geschichte), wie ich sie an anderer Stelle genannt habe, aus,[17] das sie von den sozusagen “akademischen” Formen der Digital History unterscheidet?

Die DPH und die bürgerschaftliche Dimension der Vergangenheit

Mit Web 2.0-Technologien ist es möglich, sich weltweit mit verschiedenen Gemeinschaften über ihr Wissen und ihre Erinnerungen auszutauschen, erweitert um die digitale Dimension zuzüglich der traditionellen Praktiken der Public History. Nach der Einführung des partizipativen Webs 2.0 um das Jahr 2004 begannen verschiedene Gemeinschaften ihre historischen Vorstellungen ohne die Vermittlung von HistorikerInnen zu teilen. Im Gegenteil, Oral Historians boten sich nach dem digital turn mit ihren historischen Fertigkeiten als Vermittler von mündlichen Überlieferungen an.[18] Ebenso brachten ArchivarInnen in Gebrauch ihrer professionellen Vermittlung ihre Fertigkeiten in die digitale Realität mit ein.[19] Können wir daraus schließen, dass DPH eine Möglichkeit dafür ist, wie eine Gemeinschaft von Menschen ihre historischen Erinnerungen im Netz austauscht, die wiederum vermittelt durch die digitalen Fertigkeiten und der Expertise der Public Historians ergänzt wird und sie dadurch zu Oral Historians, ArchivarInnen, MuseumsexpertInnen macht? Ist das die Dimension, die induktiv ein neues Feld definiert (oftmals auf kollaborative Weise) und deduktiv (Erstellung von digitalen Multimedia-Formaten zur Kommunikation über Vergangenheit) eine anwenderorientierte, interaktive und gemeinsame Aktivität definiert? DPH verbindet die Öffentlichkeit mit ihrer Vergangenheit und den Public Historians, wohingegen die Digital History eine neue digitale Wissenschaft anbietet, bei der die epistemologische Interaktion mit der Öffentlichkeit keine wesentliche Voraussetzung ist. Mit Digital History ist das Internet um neue Formen von Narrativen und Befunden “bereichert”, aber nicht zwangsläufig genutzt, wie etwa ein 2.0 kollaboratives und vernetztes Web, um spezifische Adressaten und spezifische soziale Ziele zu erreichen. DPH ist vor allem die Produktion von Geschichte in der öffentlichen Sphäre durch interaktive, digitale Mittel. Die Vorteile des digital turn nutzend, zielt die DPH darauf ab, neue Stimmen aus der Vergangenheit in der Gegenwart zu präsentieren, weil Vergangenheit von Bedeutung ist und sich digitale Technologien dazu eignen, im Internet über Geschichte zu kommunizieren.

____________________

Literatur

  • Jerome De Groote: Consuming History: Historians and Heritage in Contemporary Popular Culture, Hoboken: Taylor & Francis 2008.
  • Joanne Garde-Hansen, Andrew Hoskins and Anna Reading: Save as digital memories, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan 2009.
  • Erica Lehrer, Cynthia E. Milton, Monica Eileen Patterson (Hrsg.): Curating difficult knowledge: violent pasts in public places, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan 2011.

Externe Links

____________________

[1] Heimburger, Franziska / Ruiz, Émilien: «Has the Historian’s craft gone digital? Some observations from France», Diacronie, in: Studi di Storia Contemporanea. 10 (2012) 2. http://www.studistorici.com/2012/06/29/heimburger-ruiz_numero_10/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[2] Castells, Manuel: The Internet galaxy: reflections on the Internet, business, and society. New York 2001.
[3] Mccarty, Willard: Humanities computing. Basingstoke 2005.
[4] Orlandi, Tito: Informatica Umanistica. Rom 1990.
[5] Schreibman, Susan / Ray Siemens / John Unsworth (Hrsg.): A Companion to Digital Humanities. Oxford 2004, http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15). Warwick, Clare: Digital Humanities in Practice. London 2012; Terras, Melissa / Nyhan, Julianne / Vanhoutte, Edward: Defining Digital Humanities: A Reader. London 2013.
[6] Statistische Berechnung, Geo-Location, die Zuordnung der Vergangenheit, 3D-Rekonstruktionen, die Verwaltung von großen Datenmengen, die Analyse und Erstellung von digitalen Primärquellen wurde von Peter Haber als “datification” Prozess bezeichnet. Visuelle Studien etc. definieren digital history als eine spezielle Gattung der digital humanities. Vgl. Haber, Peter: Digital past: Geschichtswissenschaft im digitalen Zeitalter, München 2011.
[7] Rygiel, Philippe: L’inchiesta storica in epoca digitale. In: Memoria e Ricerca 35 (2010), S. 185-197.
[8] Eine aktuelle kanadische Studie über die Auswirkungen der digitalen Revolution hat grundsätzlichen Wert, wenn sie sagt: “Gedächtnisinstitutionen sind die Fenster zur Vergangenheit. Durch Geschichten, physische Objekte, Aufzeichnungen und anderes dokumentarisches Erbe bieten sie den Kanadiern mit einem Sinn für Geschichte ein Heimatgefühl, ein Identitätsgefühl und ein Gefühl der Verbundenheit – wer sind wir als Volk […] “Why Memory Institutions Matter”, in: Council of Canadians Academies: Leading in the Digital World: Opportunities for Canada’s Memory Institutions. The Expert Panel on Memory Institutions and the Digital Revolution, February 2015, S.4-6, http://www.scienceadvice.ca/uploads/eng/assessments%20and%20publications%20and%20news%20releases/memory/CofCA_14-377_MemoryInstitutions_WEB_E.PDF (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[9] Moretti, Franco: Distant Reading. London 2013.
[10] Vgl. z.B. diverse Projekte (wie Digital Humanities Now, http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org/), die die Integration von ausgewählten Blog-Posts sicherstellen und so weltweit neue Formen einer digitalen Nachwuchsförderung mit dem PressForward Plugin für WordPress ermöglichen http://pressforward.org/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[11] “Storia e Internet: la ricerca storica all’alba del terzo millennio”, in: Noiret, Serge (Hrsg.): Linguaggi e Siti: la Storia On Line, in Memoria e Ricerca, n.3, January-June 1999, S.7-20. Vgl. auch http://www.fondazionecasadioriani.it/modules.php?name=MR&op=showfascicolo&id=12 (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[12] Cohen, Daniel J. u.a.: “Interchange: The Promise of Digital History”. In: The Journal of American History 2 (2008), S.452-491, http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/jah/95.2/interchange.html (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[13] RRCHNM: 20th Anniversary Conference, http://chnm.gmu.edu/20th/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[14] Cohen, Daniel. J.  / Rosenzweig, Roy : Digital history: a guide to gathering, preserving, and presenting the past on the Web. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005 und Clio Wired. The future of the past in the digital age. New York 2011.
[15] Robertson, Stephen: The Differences between Digital History and Digital Humanities. 23.05.2014; http://drstephenrobertson.com/blog-post/the-differences-between-digital-history-and-digital-humanities/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[16] http://digitalpublichistory.org/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[17] «Y a t-il une Histoire Numérique 2.0 ?» in: Genet, Jean-Philippe / Zorzi, Andrea (Hrsg.): Les historiens et l’informatique. Un métier à réinventer. Rom 2011, S. 235-288.
[18] In ihrer Rede anlässlich der 2. brasilianischen Public History Konferenz (September 2014) betonte Linda Shopes, dass digital history – als Erweiterung der Sozialgeschichte und dem Vorhandensein einer gezielten Zuhörerschaft – einer der zentralen Oral-History-Praktiken ist. Digitale Arbeitsweisen führten durch Oral History zurück zur “Mündlichkeit”. Die digitale Dimension erweiterte Online-Geschichten zu Website-Projekte, sie ermöglichte damit der internationalen Public History die Erweiterung der herkömmlichen Oral History Projekte um die Fähigkeit, Interviews in Audio / Video-Formaten weltweit und über Open-Access-Verfahren zu teilen. Diese Praktiken setzen voraus, mit den Communities in der jeweils eigenen Sprache zu interagieren. Ein tieferes Verständnis der lokalen Kulturen unterscheidet die internationale DPH von digital history und, mehr noch, von den digital humanities, die sich zuletzt allzuoft durch die ausschließliche Verwendung der englischen Sprache auszeichnete. Vgl. Rede Brasileira de Historia Publica: http://historiapublica.com.br/ (zuletzt am 09.04.15).
[19] “Die Materialien in ihnen erinnern uns an unsere Werte und nähren unsere Debatten über die Zivilgesellschaft. Durch Sicherstellung ihres Erhalts, Authentizität und den Zugang zu ihrer Struktur […] garantieren Gedächtnisinstitutionen Transparenz und eine Pflicht zur Rechenschaft. Authentische Aufzeichnungen sowie deren Verfügbarkeit sind das Herzstück einer Zivilgesellschaft. Insbesondere Archive sind wesentlich zur Klärung von Menschenrechtsfragen, oftmals, weil diesbezügliche Bedenken erst weit nach der Zeit identifiziert werden, in der ein Unrecht erfolgt ist.” “Why Memory Institutions Matter”, ebd.

____________________

Abbildungsnachweis
© Serge Noiret. Aufnahme während des THATcamp 2013 in Mason.

Empfohlene Zitierweise
Noiret, Serge: Digital Public History: Einbezug der Öffentlichkeit. In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 13, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3931.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.

L’Histoire numérique a remodelé la documentation de l’historien et les outils utilisés pour accéder, stocker et utiliser la documentation sans que l’utilisation critique des outils et des pratiques numériques ait été approfondie surtout par rapport à l’histoire publique. L’histoire numérique vise à créer de nouvelles formes de savoir et d’objets pour  le web.[1] Mais on est en droit de se demander en quoi l’histoire publique numérique (HPN) se différencie de l’histoire numérique?

Des Humanités Numériques à l’Histoire Numérique

Ce que l’on entend par “culture historique numérique” fait partie du champ plus large de la “culture numérique” qui imprègne notre société depuis l’apparition d’Internet. Le concept sociologique de culture numérique provient du travail de Manuel Castells[2] et de celui de Willard McCarty[3] tandis qu’en Italie, Tito Orlandi,[4] a même théorisé la naissance d’une nouvelle koinè basée sur le développement de concepts scientifiques et méthodologiques précédents qui définissaient l’informatique humaniste à laquelle s’est ajoutée la communication dans la toile. Cependant, alors que les sciences humaines numériques fournissent des méthodologies et des pratiques communes aux sciences humaines,[5] il est également vrai que ces pratiques et ces concepts sont mieux élaborés dans chaque discipline.[6] Suite au «digital turn», les historiens qui utilisent le numérique sont confrontés à de nouvelles questions épistémologiques pour l’analyse du passé.[7] Ils mettent en scène des expositions en rapport avec les institutions de la mémoire (bibliothèques, archives, musées et galeries) ; ils créent des objets et des documents numériques ; ils recueillent, préservent et organisent les documents numériques de telles institutions;[8] ils créent de nouveaux outils et de nouveaux logiciels pour soutenir leurs activités; ils utilisent les médias sociaux pour communiquer; ils n’utilisent pas seulement les documents écrits et ne se limitent pas aux réflexions qui touchent les nouvelles formes de fouille de texte et les activités de lecture « proches et lointaines ».[9] Cependant, les historiens avec le numérique ne pratiquent pas leur profession en dehors de la discipline: ils maintiennent leurs traditions professionnelles et appliquent les méthodes historiennes ; ils traitent les sources primaires dans différents contextes numériques et ils reconstruisent le passé au travers de nouvelles formes de narration.[10] La technologie facilite en fait l’histoire professionnelle. Les humanités numériques intègrent aussi le métier de ce nouvel historien profondément impliqué dans les transformations technologiques qui affectent les sciences humaines à l’heure du numérique.

De nouvelles pratiques et de nouveaux outils

Mais dans le domaine de l’histoire numérique, nous sommes en fait ce que nous faisons et ce que nous créons. De nouvelles pratiques et de nouveaux outils délimitent ce champ. Et l’histoire numérique ne se reconnait pas seulement dans la tradition des humanités numériques. La question de l’originalité de nos méthodes, les tâches et les objectifs du numérique, ont été questionnées très tôt en Italie et, il a toujours été assez clair que nos priorités et nos besoins différaient de celles d’autres humanistes.[11] Donc, l’histoire numérique possède une dimension épistémologique propre aux historiens.[12] Les historiens ont besoin de créer des contenus, de contrôler et d’utiliser des outils dans le domaine numérique et ceux-ci sont différents de ceux qui sont nécessaires à d’autres humanistes confrontés à l’informatique littéraire et linguistique, à l’analyse des textes et à leur encodage et annotation. Stephen Robertson, directeur du Centre pour l’Histoire et les nouveaux médias de l’université George Mason, a soutenu explicitement, peut-être pour la première fois dans le monde anglophone, que l’histoire numérique est différente des études littéraires et pourrait être considérée comme une autre discipline dans le domaine du numérique. Ces réflexions ont influencé, à l’automne 2014, les célébrations du 20ème anniversaire du Centre[13] mettant l’accent sur l’importance des médias numériques pour pratiquer l’histoire.[14] «D’abord, écrit Robertson, la collecte, la présentation et la diffusion de matériaux en ligne est une partie plus centrale de l’histoire numérique. […] Deuxièmement, en ce qui concerne l’analyse grâce au numérique, l’histoire numérique a vu plus de travaux dans le domaine de la cartographie numérique que dans celui des études littéraires, où la fouille de texte et la modélisation sont pratiques dominantes. »[15]

Histoire Numérique et Histoire Publique Numérique

En parallèle avec ce qu’ils écrivent professionnellement à propos du passé, les historiens se sont toujours interrogés sur l’utilité de leurs propres pratiques et sur l’apport d’autres sciences pour éclairer l’histoire. Quel nouvel outil ou quelle technique, appliqués au passé auraient pu aider à transformer les sources primaires en récits historiques? Dans le cas de l’histoire numérique, nous sommes en droit de nous  demander si l’historiographie a toujours été communiquée au public avec succès. Il ne s’agit pas seulement des essais scientifiques typiques des historiens académiques, mais surtout de l’utilisation de différentes  formes de communication et différents médias adaptées aux différents publics, ce que Sharon M. Leon appelle l’histoire numérique centrée sur l’utilisateur.[16] Être capable de reconstruire le passé et le communiquer à un public précis, est essentiellement ce que les historiens publics font quand ils se demandent «pourquoi faire de l’histoire, si ce n’est pas pour le public?» L’HPN -comme champ scientifique- permet ainsi d’interpréter le passé et de proposer des réflexions pour l’avenir à l’intérieur de la sphère publique et à l’échelle internationale. Ceci est fait en utilisant la technologie, les expériences, les pratiques, les méthodes, les formes sociales de communication qui sont ajoutées aux caractéristiques de l’histoire publique comme le fait de penser au public afin d’interpréter le passé avec lui et, ensuite, de mieux communiquer une histoire utile. Faut-il aller plus loin dans la construction d’un arbre généalogique de l’ «Humanities Computing » (1980-) devenu « digital humanities » (humanités numériques), lors de la rencontre avec le web au début des années 1990? Peut-être pas, mais l’histoire des humanités numériques fait certainement partie de la conversation qui vise à comprendre si l’HPN non seulement diffère des Humanités Numériques comme nous l’avons soutenu, mais aussi de l’Histoire Numérique. Qu’est-ce qui définit l’HPN, ou ce que j’ai appelé ailleurs l’histoire numérique 2.0, (participative et en réseau, offrant une médiation sociale),[17] quelque peu différente de ce qu’on pourrait appeler les formes “académiques” de l’histoire numérique?

L’histoire publique numérique sert aussi la dimension civique du passé

Les techniques du Web 2.0 permettent  globalement de dialoguer avec différentes communautés et de mobiliser leurs connaissances et leurs souvenirs, ajoutant ainsi une dimension numérique aux pratiques traditionnelles de l’histoire publique. Après la naissance d’un web participatif 2.0 autour de 2004, différentes communautés ont partagé leur passé globalement sans la médiation des historiens. Au contraire, l’historien de l’oralité, comme médiateur  après la révolution numérique, a appliqué ses compétences historiennes à la mémoire orale.[18] Aussi les archivistes dans le domaine numérique conservent les traces et les souvenirs des mémoires civiles en utilisant leur propre médiation professionnelle. Pourrions-nous en conclure que l’HPN c’est filtrer les visions du passé  d’une communauté dans le web grâce aux compétences et à l’expertise des historiens publics numériques, que ce soit en tant qu’historiens oraux, archivistes, conservateurs de musée, etc.?[19] Est-ce cette dimension qui définit la discipline dans ses pratiques de bas en haut (souvent des pratiques de crowdsourcing ou en français, de production participative) et de haut en bas (création d’objets numériques multi médiaux / narration du passé) interactives et partagées avec l’utilisateur? L’HPN permet ainsi de relier un public spécifique à son passé et les historiens publics avec le numérique le diffuse dans le web. L’histoire numérique offre de nouveaux produits scientifiques pour lesquels cette interaction épistémologique avec le public n’est pas une condition essentielle. Avec l’histoire numérique, le web est utilisé pour “passer” de nouvelles formes de récits et des découvertes scientifiques, mais il n’est pas principalement utilisé, comme avec le web 2.0, pour interagir avec des publics spécifiques et atteindre des objectifs sociaux spécifiques. L’HPN c’est avant tout faire de l’histoire dans la sphère publique sur la base d’outils numériques interactifs. Profitant de la révolution numérique, l’HPN vise à apporter de nouveaux témoignages dans le présent, car le passé compte et les technologies numériques permettent de mieux communiquer l’histoire dans le web.

____________________

Littérature

  • Jerome De Groote: Consuming History: Historians and Heritage in Contemporary Popular Culture. Hoboken: Taylor & Francis, 2008
  • Joanne Garde-Hansen, Andrew Hoskins and Anna Reading: Save as.. digital memories. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
  • Erica Lehrer, Cynthia E. Milton, Monica Eileen Patterson (eds.): Curating difficult knowledge: violent pasts in public places. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Liens externe

____________________

[1] Franziska, Heimburger and Émilien Ruiz: «Has the Historian’s craft gone digital? Some observations from France», Diacronie. Studi di Storia Contemporanea, n. 10/2, 2012, http://www.studistorici.com/2012/06/29/heimburger-ruiz_numero_10/ (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[2] Manuel Castells: The Internet galaxy: reflections on the Internet, business, and society. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
[3] Willard Mccarty: Humanities computing. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
[4] Tito Orlandi: Informatica Umanistica. Roma: La Nuova Italia Scientifica, 1990.
[5] Susan Schreibman, Ray Siemens, John Unsworth (eds.): A Companion to Digital Humanities, Oxford, Blackwell, 2004, http://www.digitalhumanities.org/companion/ (dernier accès  09.04.15). Clare Warwick: Digital Humanities in Practice., London: Facet Publishing, 2012; Melissa Terras, Julianne Nyhan, and Edward Vanhoutte: Defining Digital Humanities: A Reader., London, Ashgate, 2013; Pierre Mounier (dir.), Read/Write Book 2. Une introduction aux humanités numériques, Marseille: OpenEdition Press, 2012 http://books.openedition.org/oep/226, (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[6] Calcul statistique, géolocalisation, représentations cartographiques du passé, reconstitutions en 3D, gestion de grands nombres de données, analyse et création de sources primaires numériques, transformation des données numériques, études visuelles, toutes ces pratiques définissent le menu spécifique de l’histoire numérique dans les sciences humaines numériques. (Sur ce sujet voir de Peter Haber: Digital past: Geschichtswissenschaft im digitalen Zeitalter, München: Oldenbourg Verlag, 2011.)
[7] Philippe Rygiel: “L’inchiesta storica in epoca digitale”, in Memoria e Ricerca, n.35, 2010, pp. 185-197.
[8] Un récent rapport canadien sur l’impact de la révolution numérique a une valeur universelle quand il écrit que “les institutions de la mémoire collective sont une fenêtre sur le passé. Au moyen de témoignages, d’objets, de dossiers et d’autres documents, ils donnent aux Canadiens un sens de l’histoire, du lieu et de l’identité, ainsi qu’un sentiment de connexité — d’appartenance à un peuple. […]”. “ Importance des Institutions de la Mémoire Collective”, dans Conseil des Académies Canadiennes: À la fine pointe du monde numérique: possibilités pour les institutions de la mémoire collective au Canada. Le comité d’experts sur les institutions de la mémoire collective et la révolution numérique., février 2015, pp.4-6, http://www.scienceadvice.ca/uploads/fr/assessments%20and%20publications%20and%20news%20releases/memory/CofCA_14-377_MemoryInstitutions_WEB_F.PDF (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[9] Franco Moretti: Distant Reading. London: Verso, 2013.
[10] Voir par exemple les différents projets (comme Digital Humanities Now, http://digitalhumanitiesnow.org/) qui intègrent une sélection de billets de blog publiés dans le monde entier, à l’intérieur de nouvelles formes de publications numériques en utilisant le plugin PressForward pour WordPress, http://pressforward.org/ (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[11] “Storia e Internet: la ricerca storica all’alba del terzo millennio”, dans Serge Noiret (dir.): Linguaggi e Siti: la Storia On Line, in Memoria e Ricerca, n.3, January-June 1999, pp.7-20, http://www.fondazionecasadioriani.it/modules.php?name=MR&op=showfascicolo&id=12 (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[12] Daniel J. Cohen, Max Frisch, P.Gallagher, Steven. Mintz, Kirsten Sword, A.Murrell Taylor, William G. Thomas III, et William J Turkel: “Interchange: The Promise of Digital History”, in The Journal of American History, 2, 2008, pp.452-91, http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/jah/95.2/interchange.html (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[13] RRCHNM: 20th Anniversary Conference, http://chnm.gmu.edu/20th/ (dernier accès 09.04.15).
[14] Daniel J. Cohen et Roy Rosenzweig: Digital history: a guide to gathering, preserving, and presenting the past on the Web., Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005 et Clio Wired. The future of the past in the digital Age. New York, Columbia University Press, 2011.
[15] Stephen Robertson: The Differences between Digital History and Digital Humanities. May 23, 2014; http://drstephenrobertson.com/blog-post/the-differences-between-digital-history-and-digital-humanities/ (dernier accès  09.04.15).
[16] http://digitalpublichistory.org/ (dernier accès  09.04.15).
[17] «Y a t-il une Histoire Numérique 2.0 ? » dans Jean-Philippe Genet and Andrea Zorzi (dir.) Les historiens et l’informatique. Un métier à réinventer., Rome: Ecole Française de Rome, 2011, pp.235-288.
[18] Lors de la 2ème Conférence sur l’histoire publique brésilienne, (Septembre 2014) Linda Shopes a dit que l’histoire numérique -ajoutée à l’histoire sociale et la présence d’une audience cible-, est maintenant au cœur des pratiques d’histoire orale. Les techniques numériques ont rendu l’«oralité» à l’histoire orale. Une dimension numérique a intégré l’histoire en ligne à des projets dans le web en accès libre,  ajoutant une dimension publique internationale aux projets traditionnels d’histoire orale outre la capacité de partager à l’échelle mondiale les interviews dans des formats audio / vidéo. Ces pratiques nécessitent d’interagir avec les communautés dans leur propre langue. Une meilleure compréhension des cultures locales différencie l’HPN international de l’histoire numérique et, plus encore, des humanités numériques, ces dernières trop souvent liées à l’usage exclusif de la langue anglaise. Voir Rede Brasileira de Historia Publica: http://historiapublica.com.br/ (dernier accès 04.09.15).
[19] “Leurs documents nous rappellent nos valeurs et nourrissent nos débats sur la société civile. En assurant la conservation et l’authenticité des documents, ainsi que l’accès à leurs collections […], elles constituent un instrument de transparence et de reddition de comptes. De fait, des dossiers authentiques et leur disponibilité sont au  cœur de la gouvernance civile. En particulier, les archives sont essentielles pour aborder les problèmes de droits de la personne, parce que ces problèmes ne sont souvent connus qu’après une injustice….”, dans “Importance des Institutions de la Mémoire Collective”, cit..

____________________

Crédits illustration
© Serge Noiret. Photographie pendant la THATCamp 2013 Mason.

Citation recommandée
Noiret, Serge: Digital Public History: L’importance de la dimension «publique». In: Public History Weekly 3 (2015) 13, DOI:  dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3931.

Copyright (c) 2015 by De Gruyter Oldenbourg and the author, all rights reserved. This work may be copied and redistributed for non-commercial, educational purposes, if permission is granted by the author and usage right holders. For permission please contact: elise.wintz (at) degruyter.com.


Categories: 3 (2015) 13
DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1515/phw-2015-3931

Tags: , ,

2 replies »

  1. This contribution by Serge Noiret presents, in brief, the main issues of the Digital Historian’s work.

    The keyword of his text is “distinction”: that is, what distinguishes the Digital History within the wider field of the Digital Humanities, its peculiar characteristics against or in confront of the traditional historiographical practice, and above all what constitutes the specific task of Digital Public History (DPH).

    This exercise is not easy, even if dutiful. Understanding what features any cultural activity is part of the intellectual process that must define the limits and purposes of the research and gives it a scientific status.

    The community of scholars feels that this effort to define and border knowledge is more urgent as the practice of the studies creates confusion and goes beyond the traditional boundaries. The digital turn happened within a short period of time from the birth of the personal computer and the emergence of the Web. It has received a further push forward, not predictable and devastating, by the 2.0 tools. Within a few years our everyday life has become part of a complex ecosystem where the boundaries between the physical and digital worlds become intertwined. In my opinion, this is the reason why scholars have made considerable efforts in recent years to understand and define the ongoing transformation, particularly to identify the fields of Digital Culture, Public History, and now, Digital Public History.

    Thus, I understand the reasons behind Serge Noiret’s efforts to define areas of action and prevailing trends in the Digital History practice: however, this anxiety to standardize knowledge, to include research practices in a precise taxonomy of disciplines, could be a risky exercise, especially at this stage. This effort could in fact restrain the experimental and innovative feature of the research.

    Besides the fact that a Digital Historian naturally tends to use some tools more than others, depending on his/her own interests, on the aims of the research and the peculiarities of the sources, the very fact of working in the Digital Humanities field will push inevitably him/her to overcome and then mongrelize the disciplines. This fact, which can be perceived as a generator of confusion, in my opinion is instead a golden opportunity, to finally bring out the history from the shoals of an excessive specialization. In the digital dimension, the historian has the chance to be again a complete humanist, without losing identity.

    It is certainly true, as Stephen Robertson warns, that in the field of digital humanities, digital history is different from literary studies, the latter is much more interested in activities of text mining, topic modeling, and sentiment analysis. However, it is equally true that historical research can range on broad and differentiated sources, including sources needing an automatic language treatment. When this happens, where lies the dividing line?

    I believe that if we want to specify a specific feature of the Digital History, this is, as the end Serge Noiret seems to point out, its public dimension. Although Public History was born long before the Web and outside of the digital world, it is undeniable that the web 2.0 has profoundly innovated and problematized methodology, epistemology and purposes of the Historian’s Craft. When a scholar promotes the transcription or the cataloging of the sources among a more or less wide community of non-specialists (crowdsourcing), when he/her finds historical sources created directly on the web and immediately reworked and reinterpreted by a virtual community, when bottom-up initiatives rewrite history at different levels and with different purposes with a direct impact in the real society, then the Digital Historian must act, dealing with a new way to do history: the Digital Public History (DPH).

    Today the historian who wishes to do well in his craft should carefully consider the digital world (and thus make himself/herself aware of all its issues) and this choice will lead him/her inevitably to wonder what kind of relationship he/her wants to create with the people, which is his/her role inside real/virtual society or real/virtual communities which he/her addresses to. The historian could continue to act in the tradition, simply exploiting the huge deposit of knowledge of the Web and then writing the usual scientific essays, perfectly delimited by his/her subject area. This would be not innovative at all even if this scholar later publishes his/her essay on the Internet, thus making it available to a number of readers and opening to be read and used in manners not previously considered. The alternative, preferable in my opinion, is to engage ourselves in this huge change by operating as mediators in a process of recovery and re-writing of the past, which today has countless authors and, doing so, becoming key figures in the present society. We should do it because we aim to “bring new voices from the past into the present” and, as Noiret says, “because those pasts matter and because digital technologies are suited to communicating history via and in the web.”

  2. Comme le soulignait Michel de Certeau déjà dans les années 1970, “envisager l’histoire comme une opération, ce sera tenter (…) de la comprendre comme le rapport entre une place (un recrutement, un milieu, un métier) et des procédures d’analyses (une discipline).” (Certeau Michel De, « L’opération historique », in: Faire de l’histoire, Gallimard, 1974, pp. 18.) Lorsqu’une nouvelle technologie vient modifier en profondeur les procédés d’écriture et de lecture d’une société, sans compter ses modes d’organisation, il faut alors supposer que les méthodes de l’histoire évoluent elles aussi, comme modifiées par des facteurs externes, et que donc la discipline se transforme.

    Mais l’évolution technologique n’est qu’un facteur parmi d’autres dans l’équation, et les logiques socio-professionnelles internes à un milieu, dans notre cas celui des historiens – le recrutement, l’évaluation de la qualité, les modes de communication scientifique, l’enseignement – jouent un rôle très fort dans la façon dont la discipline évolue en rapport au contexte technologique et social. Et si les dynamiques du changement technologique – programmes, interfaces, plateformes – sont très rapides, celles du changement professionnel sont beaucoup plus lentes.

    A mon sens, les évolutions que décrit Serge Noiret dans son article – l’histoire numérique et l’histoire publique numérique – sont des lieux privilégiés où se négocient les transformations contemporaines des disciplines historiques. Portées d’une part par une demande de la part du grand public pour la mémoire et l’histoire en forte croissance depuis bientôt trente ans, et d’autre part par des évolutions technologiques qui rendent possible chaque jour de nouveaux modes de communication et d’échange, mais frustrées en même temps par la réticences des historiens académiques – garants de l’orthodoxie critique de la discipline – à s’aventurer sur ces terrains encore largement inconnus, l’histoire numérique et l’histoire publique numérique sont naturellement tentées de se fonder en disciplines à part entière et de revendiquer leur propre spécificité, revendiquant ainsi leur originalité ainsi que leur raison d’être, tout en évitant diplomatiquement de porter des accusations – pourtant parfois justifiées – contre les historiens tenants de l’orthodoxie pour leur frilosité.

    Un développement récent interne à la discipline me semble révélateur de ces états de fait. Après avoir publié successivement en 2012 et 2013 deux appels ouvertement critiques contre le mouvement de l’Open Access – et suscité un large débat interne à la profession – l’American Historical Association a publié en juin 2015 des “Guidelines for the Evaluation of Digital Scholarship in History” qui pour la première fois reconnaissent explicitement l’apport des technologies numériques, notamment pour renforcer les liens entre la discipline historique et le grand public. En ce sens, les débats méthodologiques et définitoires suscités par l’histoire numérique et l’histoire publique numérique sont salutaires, car ils alimentent une discussion critique sur le rôle et l’évolution des disciplines historiques dans les sociétés contemporaines.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 characters available

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This